monoploid


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hap·loid

(hap'loyd),
Denoting the number of chromosomes in sperm or ova, which is half the number in somatic (diploid) cells; the haploid number in normal human beings is 23.
Synonym(s): monoploid
[G. haplos, simple, + eidos, appearance]

monoploid

(mŏn′ə-ploid′)
adj.
Having a single set of chromosomes; haploid.
n.
A monoploid cell or organism.

monoploid

adjective Characterised by a single set of chromosomes.

monoploid

an organism or cell in which there is one set of chromosomes instead of the normal two.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Given a unitary [S.sup.3]PR (N, [M.sub.0]), the initial marking of the resource in a monoploid holder-resource circuit does not affect the maximal number of steps needed to look ahead in an optimal DAP.
We consider two cases: (1) a resource r in a monoploid holder-resource circuit is not included in a strict minimal siphon and (2) a resource r in a monoploid holder-resource circuit is included in a strict minimal siphon.
Let m, n, p, and q represent the numbers of monoploid HR-circuits topologically associated with [p.sub.8], where m, n, p, q [member of] N.
Let [mathematical expression not reproducible] and [mathematical expression not reproducible] represent the set of resource places and holder places of [alpha] monoploid HR-circuits ([alpha] [member of] [m, n, p, q}, resp.).
We conclude that the initial number of tokens in the resource places of the monoploid holder-resource circuits does not affect the maximal number of steps needed to look ahead in an optimal DAP.
doubled monoploid DM1-3 (The Potato Genome Consortium, 2011).
Potato monoploids (lx) can be produced from diploids via anther
While the production of monoploids through anther culture is possible,
These monoploids can be somatically doubled to produce homozygous
(1960) studied the mutations affecting quantitative traits in the selfed progeny of doubled monoploids. They found significant heritable variation by the fifth generation after doubling and estimated a mutation rate of 4.5 per 100 gametes (Sprague et al., 1960).