monolingual

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monolingual

(mŏn″ō-lĭng′gwĭl)
Being able to speak only one language in a semantically correct and fluent manner.
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References in periodicals archive ?
As expected, the prevalence of English monolingualism varies significantly across generational status.
Some became 'subtractive bilinguals', moving from an ability to use two languages to monolingualism. This often becomes a source of regret, as people realise later in life that they have missed out on access to another language and culture that could connect them with wider family and their culture of origin.
Overall, the countries in our sample showed a marked trend toward decreasing monolingualism (presenting their university websites in only one language) during the five-year period studied.
We can enlist the uninvited narratives we trade in daily to conceptualize a new literacy education, one that cultivates the communicative competencies that globalization demands, and more importantly, one that addresses the legacies of colonization, racism, heterosexism, sexism, and monolingualism that are carried in fast capitalism.
In 1978, changes to the Spanish constitution recognised the existence of different languages in Spain and the right to multilingualism, after the monolingualism of the Franco years (Moll, 1992).
This volume challenges linguists, sociolinguists, teachers, learners, policy makers and communities of users to respond to the still pervasive monolingualism, and to recognise the very rich language and culture possibilities that are the fabric of contemporary Australia in a globalised, naturally multilingual world.
This attitude was replaced by a push for a national identity that was expressed at this time through the predominant British culture and the goal of monolingualism (Lo Bianco & Slaughter, 2009, p.
Unless there is outright prohibition, made effective in some extreme way, the rate of loss is typically three-generational, so that such migrant languages reduce 4% to 50% in each generation, from original language monolingualism, to bilingualism across generations, to host language monolingualism.
However, between 1872 and 1880, in several colonies, 'education acts', aimed primarily at secularising education--which had hitherto been controlled by the competing interests of several churches--gave multilingualism its first blow by imposing English monolingualism on mainstream schools.
Monolingualism, writes Yasemin Yildiz, "constitutes a key structuring principle that organizes the entire range of modern social life." (4) As she has shown, the modern state made monolingualism the pillar of such institutions as schools and universities.
"Those who learn an additional language acquire mental advantages beyond monolingualism. Learning another language in childhood improves cognitive abilities, allowing the brain to more easily alternate between activities, focus more clearly in a busy environment, and remember things better." 1