monogenetic


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mon·o·ge·net·ic

(mon'ō-jĕ-net'ik),
Relating to monogenesis.
Synonym(s): monoxenous

monogenetic

(mŏn′ə-jə-nĕt′ĭk)
adj.
1. Relating to or exhibiting monogenesis.
2. Having a single host through the course of the life cycle.

mon·o·ge·net·ic

(mon'ō-jĕ-net'ik)
Relating to monogenesis.
Synonym(s): monoxenous.
References in periodicals archive ?
(37.) Suydam EL (1971) The micro - ecology of three species of monogenetic trematode of fishes from the Beaufort Cape Haheras area.
Monogenetic, behind-the-front volcanism in Southeastern Guatemala and Western El Salvador: [.sup.40]Ar/[.sup.39]Ar ages and tectonic implications.
Cotransporters, WNKs and hypertension: Important leads from the study of monogenetic disorders of blood pressure regulation.
MEXICO CITY (CyHAN)- There are more than 3,000 monogenetic volcanoes in Mexico that could experience a major eruption, a researcher said on Tuesday.
Koeberlinia is monogenetic, and had been thought to consist of the single species K.
The importance of the melanocortin signaling pathway in humans for the control of appetite and energy balance is suggested by numerous monogenetic mutations identified in genes involved in the synthesis or processing of the glycoprotein POMC, or in mutations that lead to defects in POMC signaling via the melanocortin receptors.
Acolpenteron ureteroecetes a monogenetic trematode from the ureters of the black basses, with a revision of the family Calceostomatidae (Gyrodactyloidea).
Cusack & Cone (1985) elucidated using electron microscopy the presence of bacteria in close association with monogenetic trematodes and suggested a vectoring role for these parasites.
Thalassemia is one of the major monogenetic single-gene disorders globally and it was the first disease studied by using techniques of molecular biology.1,2 The term thalassemia comes from the Greek word "thalas" which means the sea, and "emia" that stands for blood.3,4 The composite word came into use because this type of anaemia was originally described only in countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea.
Numerical recognition of alignments in monogenetic volcanic areas: examples from the Michoacan-Guanajuato Volcanic Field in Mexico and Calatrava in Spain.
In Chapter 1, "Critical Review of the Literature on the Origins of Papiamentu," a number of competing hypotheses are discarded: (a) a Spanish-based origin; (b) a "global" Portuguese Pidgin monogenetic approach, claiming a shared origin for Papiamentu, Saramaccan, and Palenquero and all African Portuguese-based Creoles; and (c) a Brazilian origin and transfer to Curasao through the Sephardic refugees from Brazil.
Ambroise Wonkam is a medical geneticist trained at the University of Geneva, Switzerland, whose research interest is reflected in more than 70 publications with a focus on monogenetic diseases of people of African descent.