monogenesis


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mon·o·gen·e·sis

(mon'ō-jen'ĕ-sis),
1. The production of similar organisms in each generation.
2. The production of young by one parent only, as in nonsexual generation and parthenogenesis.
3. The process of parasitizing a single host, in which the life cycle of the parasite is passed; for example, Boophilus annulatus, the one-host cattle tick, or certain trematodes of the order Monogenea.
[mono- + G. genesis, origin, production]

monogenesis

(mŏn′ə-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs)
n.
Development from a single source, such as a cell, an ancestor, or a language.

mo·nog′e·nous (mə-nŏj′ə-nəs) adj.

mon·o·gen·e·sis

(mon'ō-jen'ĕ-sis)
1. The production of similar organisms in each generation.
2. The production of young by one parent only, as in nonsexual generation and parthenogenesis.
3. The process of parasitizing a single host, in which the entire life cycle of the parasite is passed.
[mono- + G. genesis, origin, production]

monogenesis

(mŏn″ō-jĕn′ĕ-sĭs) [Gr. monos, single, + genesis, generation, birth]
1. Production of offspring of only one sex.
2. The theory that all organisms arise from a single cell.
3. Asexual reproduction.
References in periodicals archive ?
Trombetti A (1907) Come si fa la critica di un libro: con nuovi contributi alla dottrina della monogenesi del linguaggio e alla glottologia generale comparata.
in the final analysis, both appear to support monogenesis (the single source hypothesis) of language and its strictly human faculty (4).
But the defense of monogenesis, so central to Kidd's arguments, was equally pronounced among Catholic theologians, and Church punishments for pre-Adamite heresies were also severe.
Redefining the possibilities of what it means to be "of one blood," Hopkins's volatile magnetism literally flows through all human beings, and by virtue of this substance, all human beings share a powerful unity that can never be achieved through the more limited biological or genealogical paraphrase of "one blood" as a figurative reference to the theory of monogenesis.
Eliot's writings as a whole strongly suggest that she had no sympathy with their views and like Darwin supported monogenesis. However, Gilman's view has been accepted and taken further by some Eliot critics:
The question of hybridity was at the center of the most contentious debate in race theory of the nineteenth century: whether the different races were in fact different species (polygenesis) or had developed along different paths but were of the same species (monogenesis).
This includes the ongoing debate over monogenesis and polygenesis, and the argument over the appearance and origins of the Bible's key actors.
Until the mid-nineteenth century, ethnologists overwhelmingly defended Genesis and embraced monogenesis. In the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, researchers such as German Johann Blumenbach, Frenchmen Comte de Buffon and Cuvier, and British James Prichard all staunchly defended the common origin of humanity.
Linguistic researchers have still not been able to come to agreement on the question of whether Papiamentu resulted from the contact between the Spanish conquistadors and the Amer-Indian residents of the islands beginning in 1499 (polygenesis theory), or from an Afro-Portuguese pidgin that originated on the west coast of Africa as the African-Atlantic slave trade developed (monogenesis theory).
He argues that other differences--such as religion--proved more divisive than racial distinction, which became a vehicle for Enlightenment thinkers who included black writers Olaudah Equiano and Ignatius Sancho, to express skepticism toward the church by problematizing its official doctrine of monogenesis.
(4) Monogenesis is the belief that the activity of only