monogamy

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mo·nog·a·my

(mŏ-nog'ă-mē),
The marriage or mating system in which each partner has but one mate.
[mono- + G. gamos, marriage]

monogamy

(mə-nŏg′ə-mē)
n.
1. The practice or condition of having a single sexual partner during a period of time.
2.
a. The practice or condition of being married to only one person at a time.
b. The practice of marrying only once in a lifetime.
3. Zoology The condition of having only one mate during a breeding season or during the breeding life of a pair.

mo·nog′a·mist n.
mo·nog′a·mous adj.
mo·nog′a·mous·ly adv.

monogamy

(1) A  mating system in which one female and one male bond only with each other.
(2) The state of having one partner or mate.

monogamy

The state of having one spouse or mate

mo·nog·a·my

(mŏn-og'ă-mē)
The marriage or mating system in which each partner has but one mate.
[mono- + G. gamos, marriage]

monogamy

a state where a single male pairs with a single female in a partnership that may last for several seasons or life. Monogamy is common in birds such as swans, but rare in mammals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since there was little change among cohorts in age of first intercourse, number of partners, or distribution of behavioural groups, we combined the 1990-2010 cohorts and examined differences between abstainers, monogamists, and experimenters, with special attention to those who were currently sexually active.
In contrast, monogamists had significantly larger lifetime proportions of serious/ committed partners, men: F(2, 513) = 27.093, p = .000, [r.sup.2] = .094; women: F(2, 566) = 19.859, p = .000, [r.sup.2] = .065 (see Tables 5A-1 and 5A-2).
Among monogamists, 52% of males and 48% of females had had sex with a friend (FWB relationship) while 42% of monogamist males and 31% of monogamist females had had sex with at least one acquaintance or stranger ("casual hookup") (see Table 5B).
Binomial logistic regression (forced entry method) was used to predict which sexually active students were likely to become experimenters rather than monogamists (see Table 6).
Experimenters' sexual behaviour is distinct from that of monogamists, involving concurrent sexual partners and lower degrees of emotional intimacy.
Condom use was equally low among all types of monogamists, suggesting that self-definition, rather than relationship length or number of partners, was the primary impetus for abandoning condom use.
The slight inconsistency occurred because a few almost/ serially monogamists had more than two partners within the past year, while a handful of free experimenters had no partners outside of their two ongoing relationships.
However, they engaged in sexual intercourse less frequently than monogamists. For OUC students, as for the Americans surveyed by Michael, Gagnon, Laumann, and Kolata (1994), those with one committed partner had the most intercourse and reported the most satisfaction with their sex lives (see Table 5).
Celibates, monogamists, and free experimenters engaged in progressively less rigorous sexual negotiation.
Monogamists were also cautious, frequently asking potential partners about their past and occasionally changing their minds about having sex based upon such inquiries.