monocytosis


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Related to monocytosis: reactive monocytosis

monocytosis

 [mon″o-si-to´sis]
excess of monocytes in the blood.

mon·o·cy·to·sis

(mon'ō-sī-tō'sis),
An abnormal increase in the number of monocytes in the circulating blood.

monocytosis

(mŏn′ə-sī-tō′sĭs)
n. pl. monocyto·ses (-sēz)
An abnormal increase of monocytes in the blood, occurring in infectious mononucleosis and certain bacterial infections such as tuberculosis.

monocytosis

A relative or absolute ↑ in number of monocytes, which may be benign and reactive, premalignant or malignant–NHL, Hodgkin's disease. See Reactive monocytosis.

mon·o·cy·to·sis

(mon'ō-sī-tō'sis)
An abnormal increase in the number of monocytes in the circulating blood.

monocytosis

An abnormal increase in the numbers of MONOCYTES in the blood. This occurs in severe TUBERCULOSIS and MALARIA.

mon·o·cy·to·sis

(mon'ō-sī-tō'sis)
An abnormal increase in the number of monocytes in the circulating blood.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, the monocytosis and thrombocytopenia conditions were possibly due to the high parasitic intensities caused by Trichodina spp., I.
Increased monocytosis (20%) with ovalshaped, slightly irregular nuclei was present.
In the current study, hemato-biochemical analysis revealed mild normocytic normochromic regenerative anemia, normocytic hypochromic anemia and macrocytic-normochromic anemia, slightly elevated WBC count (in all cats) with mild basophilia and monocytosis. In FHM, macrocytic-normochromic response of the hematopoietic system reflects the degree of the regenerative response projected to communicate the severity of the anemia (Kurtdede and Ural, 2004).
The most remarkable laboratory findings related with sandfly fever include leukopenia, lymphopenia, monocytosis, thrombocytopenia, increased liver function tests and increased CK level (5, 6).
[1] There was a reciprocal monocytosis at each low point of the neutrophil count in our patient, who responded to three courses of G-CSF but still experienced neutropaenic cycles; this has been described in the literature.
Lab test results revealed the following: white blood cell (WBC) count, 13,000/[mm.sup.3] with relative monocytosis (14%); lymphocytosis (44%) with normal neutrophils and no bands; hemoglobin, 12 g/dL; hematocrit, 36/[mm.sup.3]; and platelets, 300,000/[mm.sup.3].
Myeloid-specific inactivation of p15Ink4b results in monocytosis and predisposition to myeloid leukemia.
Our results suggest that leukocytosis after the RE occurs due to an increase in the neutrophilia and monocytosis, once the plasma volume correction has shown that the rod neutrophils (young) and the lymphocytes were not increased when compared with the basal collection.
Laboratory tests revealed hyperbilirubinemia (total bilirubin 21.5 mg/dL; reference interval, <8.5 mg/dL), an agranulocytosis [absolute neutrophil count (ANC), (3) <0.04 X [10.sup.9] /L; reference interval, 5-21 X [10.sup.9]/L], eosinophilia (0.83 X [10.sup.9]/L; reference interval, <0.5 X [10.sup.9]/L), and monocytosis (3.8 X [10.sup.9]/L; reference interval, <1.1 X [10.sup.9]/L).
Similarly, monocytosis has been reported to occur, although the present study showed that the majority of malaria patients had a low mean monocyte count.
Monocytosis can be seen in acute and chronic inflammations, immune mediated diseases, disorders of tissue damage, monocytic leukaemia and geriatric ages.