monocyte


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Related to monocyte: Lymphocytes, basophil, eosinophil

monocyte

 [mon´o-sīt]
a mononuclear, phagocytic leukocyte, 13 μm to 25 μm in diameter, having an ovoid or kidney-shaped nucleus and azurophilic cytoplasmic granules. Monocytes are derived from promonocytes in the bone marrow and circulate in the blood for about 24 hours before migrating to the tissues, such as the lung and liver, where they develop into macrophages. adj., adj monocyt´ic.

mon·o·cyte

(mon'ō-sīt),
A relatively large mononuclear leukocyte (16-22 mcm in diameter) that normally constitutes 3-7% of the leukocytes of the circulating blood and is normally found in lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow, and loose connective tissue. When treated with the usual dyes, monocytes manifest an abundant pale blue or blue-gray cytoplasm that contains numerous fine, dustlike, red-blue granules; vacuoles are frequently present; the nucleus is usually indented, or slightly folded, and has a stringy chromatin structure that seems more condensed where the delicate strands are in contact. Monocytes that leave the bloodstream and enter the connective tissue spaces are called macrophages.
See also: monocytoid cell, endothelial leukocyte.
[mono- + G. kytos, cell]

monocyte

(mŏn′ə-sīt′)
n.
A large, circulating, phagocytic white blood cell, having a single well-defined nucleus and very fine granulation in the cytoplasm. Monocytes constitute from 3 to 8 percent of the white blood cells in humans.

mon′o·cyt′ic (-sĭt′ĭk), mon′o·cy′toid′ (-sī′toid′) adj.

monocyte

Hematology A phagocytic WBC that arises in BM from a common progenitor, CFU-GM; 'daughter' monocytes circulate in the blood, forming resident and transient populations in various sites; resident monocytes–histiocytes include Kupffer cells–liver, Langerhans cells–dermis, microglial cells–brain, pleural, peritoneal, alveolar macrophages and osteoclasts; monocytes normally constitute 2%–8% of peripheral WMCs, measure 12-25 µm, have a reniform nucleus with lacy chromatin, an N:C ratio of 4:1 to 2:1, and gray blue cytoplasm containing lysosomal enzymes–eg, acid phos, arginase, cathepsins, collagenases, deoxyribonuclease, lipases, glycosidases, plasminogen activator and others, and surface receptors–eg, FcIgG and C3R; monocytes are less efficient in phagocytosis than PMNs, but have a critical role in antigen processing. See CFU-GM, White blood cell.

mon·o·cyte

(mon'ō-sīt)
A relatively large mononuclear leukocyte (16-22 mcm in diameter); monocytes normally constitute 3-7% of the leukocytes of the circulating blood; normally found in lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow, and loose connective tissue. In stained smears, monocytes have abundant pale blue or blue-gray cytoplasm that contains numerous fine red-blue granules and vacuoles; the nucleus is usually indented, or slightly folded.
[mono- + G. kytos, cell]
Enlarge picture
MONOCYTES: (Orig. mag. ×640)

monocyte

(mon'o-sit?) [ mono- + -cyte],

MO

A mononuclear phagocytic white blood cell derived from myeloid stem cells. Monocytes circulate in the bloodstream for about 24 hr and then move into tissues, at which point they mature into macrophages, which are long lived. Monocytes and macrophages are one of the first lines of defense in the inflammatory process. This network of fixed and mobile phagocytes that engulf foreign antigens and cell debris previously was called the reticuloendothelial system and is now referred to as the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS).
See: illustration; blood for illus.; macrophagemonocytic (mon-o-sit'ik), adjectiveillustration

monocyte

A large white blood cell with a round or kidney-shaped nucleus. There are no granules in the CYTOPLASM. The monocyte migrates to the tissues where it becomes a MACROPHAGE.

monocyte

or

macrocyte

a type of LEUCOCYTE (white blood cell) of the AGRANULOCYTE group that is produced from stem cells in the bone marrow and is 12–15 μm in diameter. Monocytes remain in the blood for a short time and then migrate to other tissues as MACROPHAGES, moving particularly to those areas invaded by bacteria and other foreign materials where they ingest large particles by PHAGOCYTOSIS. See also HISTOCYTE, LYMPHOCYTE.

Monocyte

White blood cell that increases during a variety of conditions including severe infections. It removes debris and microorganisms by phagocytosis.

mon·o·cyte

(mon'ō-sīt)
A relatively large mononuclear leukocyte that normally constitutes 3-7% of the leukocytes in circulating blood.
[mono- + G. kytos, cell]
References in periodicals archive ?
Monocyte count/HDL cholesterol ratio and cardiovascular events in patients with chronic kidney disease.
Positive Correlation between Ferritin and Activated Monocyte in Iron Overloaded Major a-thalassemia Patients.
In the first restricted model, both the minimum monocyte and the maximum RDW are significant (p<0.05, odds ratio=8.84 and 4.03, respectively), whereas the full model does not include the maximum RDW (although there was no important effect of age on mortality in the full model in which the APACHE II score was added, age was also an important factor in the first model).
Lymphocyte to monocyte ratio and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio are superior inflammation-based predictors of recurrence in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma after hepatic resection.
A recent flow cytometry study observed that saliva cells are primarily leukocytes that were highly enriched for monocytes and granulocytes (Vidovic et al.
Monocyte, alongside neutrophils and platelets, was known to be responsible for the initiation and amplification of deep vein thrombosis [39].
The role of EPCs in the promotion of angiogenesis and revascularization is usually supported by other cell types including pericytes and proangiogenic subsets of monocytes. In addition, proangiogenic monocytes, similarly to EPCs, were shown to support local stem and progenitor cell differentiation in the bone marrow [15, 16].
Caption: Figure 5: Block of the p38 or ERK pathway attenuated AGE-induced monocyte proliferation and proinflammatory activation.
The observed high serum P-SEP levels in GPP might reflect a sterile activation of P-SEP-producing cells, such as monocytes and/or neutrophils.
Guyre, "Up-regulation of human monocyte CD163 upon activation of cell-surface Toll-like receptors," Journal of Leukocyte Biology, vol.
Monocyte Protein Profiling in Low versus High BMD Condition
Mundle et al., "Phagocytosis and postphagocytic reaction of cord blood and adult blood monocyte after infection with green fluorescent protein-labeled Escherichia coli and group B Streptococci," Cytometry Part B: Clinical Cytometry, vol.

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