monochord


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

monochord

(mŏn′ō-kord) [″ + chorde, cord]
A single-string instrument used for testing upper tone audition.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
(77) Siemen Terpstra, "An Introduction to the Monochord", Alexandria 2: The Journal of the Western Cosmological Traditions, vol.
Sermo Sancti Bernardi abbatis de modo psalendi; notes on ratios; tables of intervals and hexachords; treatise on music fundamentals; table of note values; table relating musical scale to planets, muses, etc.; diagram of monochord division.
Here she plays an instrument called the monochord which looks like a sitar the size of a small boat and is used to produce a drone sound.
In addition, in the Cursus mathematicus, ii (Sant Angelo, 1668), Caramuel describes the use of the musical line on the pantometer in tuning instruments, although his explanation is confused, for a diatonic monochord with Pythagorean intonation is included in the text, and the musical line in the illustration of the pantometer is divided chromatically according to a system that could correspond only to just intonation or a mean-tone temperament.(56)
Jehan des Murs suggests at the beginning of the second book that a knowledge of the division of the monochord offers promise for understanding of the structure of various instruments as well as for inventing new, unknown ones (pp.
In For Harry, very beautifully shaped electronic tones alternate with what sound like recordings of one of Partch's stringed instruments but were actually derived from a simple monochord instrument that Kenneth constructed.
To the left, Boethius himself appears with a so-called monochord, an instrument consisting of a single taut string whose length can be varied.
Similarly, if one had a single string monochord and plucked the string, it would vibrate and other monochords of the same note but at different octaves would also vibrate--as seen in Figure 7.
In the final section Wood examines allusions to music, performance, and sound within such poems as "The Sea-Limits," "The Monochord," and "For an Allegorical Dance of Women." Observing that Rossetti extends the "performative space" of his poems through a mixture of visual and temporal impressions, she concludes that he contributes to Victorian aestheticism by "framing art not as a material object, but as an interpretive process" (553).
Ulrich contends that the earliest version of the instrument was most likely the early monochord. This argument is the most contentious claim of the book, and Ulrich presents it with great passion.
She enjoyed dancing, played the guitar, monochord and clavichord, and did not neglect to pass on these accomplishments to her daughter.
Village Life have released albums by Orquestra Mahatma & The Solid Strings, Martin Speake, a Clarvis trio with Stan Sulzmann and Tony Hymas and a Slany solo project called Monochord Music.