monoamine

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monoamine

 [mon″o-am´ēn]
an amine containing only one amino group.
monoamine oxidase (MAO) a copper-containing enzyme that deaminates monoamines such as dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, and serotonin. See also monoamine oxidase inhibitor.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mon·o·am·ine

(mon'ō-am'ēn, -in), Although this word is correctly stressed on the second-last syllable, U.S. usage often stresses it on the last syllable.
A molecule containing one amine group.
Synonym(s): monamine
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

monoamine

(mŏn′ō-ăm′ēn, -ə-mēn′)
n.
An amine compound containing one amino group, especially a compound that functions as a neurotransmitter.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

monoamine

A class of molecules that contain one amino group connected to an aromatic ring by a two-carbon chain. The physiologically important monoamines derive from aromatic amino acids—phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan—and the thyroid hormones by the action of aromatic amino acid decarboxylase enzymes. They include neurotransmitters and neuromodulators, in particular catecholamines (dopamine, epinephrine and norepinephrine) and tryptamines (serotonin and melatonin).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

monoamine

Pharmacology A class of hormones or neurotransmitters–eg, catecholamines–dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine and indoleamines–serotonin, melatonin, which have 1 amine. See Catecholamine.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

mon·o·am·ine

, monamine (mon'ō-ǎ-mēn', mon-amin)
A molecule containing one amine group.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
These data suggested that the DSHH can successfully reverse LH surge after ovary removal and also increase the monoamine neurotransmitters in the menopausal rats with the lack of interest, loss of will behavior, loss of pleasure, and so on.
Chronic Effect of Aspartame on Ionic Homeostasis and Monoamine Neurotransmitters in the Rat Brain.
This enzyme degrades monoamine neurotransmitters after their reabsorption into the presynaptic neuron.
The present study suggests that SCLPN may function as an antidepressant, and the antidepressant-like effects of SCLPN may be mediated by modulation of brain monoamine neurotransmitters and intracellular [Ca.sup.2+] concentration.
From Table 2, compared with that of the control group, we can see that the contents of monoamine neurotransmitter in rat brain, including 5-HT and NE were decreased significantly due to the nitroglycerin treatment in the model group, while the contents of 5-HIAA and DA were no significant change after the treatment.
Interactions between monoamine neurotransmitters system including 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), noradrenaline (NA) and dopamine (DA) in the brain along with their specific reuptake and receptor protein has gain so much interest in the spectrum of antidepressant studies (Yi et al.
Although experiments on mice showed an association between post-stroke depression and low levels of monoamine neurotransmitters and FGF-2, the link between FGF and depression is not clearly established yet (16).
[2] It inhibits the uptake of monoamine neurotransmitters into storage granules, resulting in the metabolism of these neurotransmitters by monoamine oxidase.
Comment: As an essential cofactor for enzymes involved in the production of monoamine neurotransmitters and the metabolism of phenylalanine, BH4 may play an important role in neuropsychiatric function.
(9) The monoamine hypothesis was developed following observation of antidepressant effects in drugs that increase synaptic concentrations of monoamine neurotransmitters. This has led to increasingly refined therapies that target specific aspects of neurotransmission in the brain.
Abnormalities of central nervous system metabolism and function, involving the monoamine neurotransmitters, play an important role in the pathogenesis of depression (Coppen 1967; Schildkraut 1965).
Both have the goal of keeping levels of monoamine neurotransmitters in the brain balanced after birth.