monoamine


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

monoamine

 [mon″o-am´ēn]
an amine containing only one amino group.
monoamine oxidase (MAO) a copper-containing enzyme that deaminates monoamines such as dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, and serotonin. See also monoamine oxidase inhibitor.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mon·o·am·ine

(mon'ō-am'ēn, -in), Although this word is correctly stressed on the second-last syllable, U.S. usage often stresses it on the last syllable.
A molecule containing one amine group.
Synonym(s): monamine
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

monoamine

(mŏn′ō-ăm′ēn, -ə-mēn′)
n.
An amine compound containing one amino group, especially a compound that functions as a neurotransmitter.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

monoamine

A class of molecules that contain one amino group connected to an aromatic ring by a two-carbon chain. The physiologically important monoamines derive from aromatic amino acids—phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan—and the thyroid hormones by the action of aromatic amino acid decarboxylase enzymes. They include neurotransmitters and neuromodulators, in particular catecholamines (dopamine, epinephrine and norepinephrine) and tryptamines (serotonin and melatonin).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

monoamine

Pharmacology A class of hormones or neurotransmitters–eg, catecholamines–dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine and indoleamines–serotonin, melatonin, which have 1 amine. See Catecholamine.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

mon·o·am·ine

, monamine (mon'ō-ǎ-mēn', mon-amin)
A molecule containing one amine group.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
More than half of the sample (57.7%, n = 194) provided a neuroscience conceptualization of depression, such as the monoamine or neuroplasticity hypothesis.
Murakami et al., "Effects of zonisamide on K+ and Ca2+ evoked release of monoamine as well as K+ evoked intracellular Ca2+ mobilization in rat hippocampus," Epilepsy Research, vol.
Table 4: Comparison of monoamine and cortisone levels in CSF ([bar.x] [+ or -] s).
Di Lisa, "Monoamine oxidases as sources of oxidants in the heart," Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology, vol.
Elokely et al., "Isolation of acacetin from Calea urticifolia with inhibitory properties against human monoamine oxidase-A and -B," Journal of Natural Products, vol.
One way that we know that the monoamine dopamine is involved in depression is through the response to medication therapy.
The effect of age on the activity and molecular properties of human brain monoamine oxidase.
With regard to neurotoxic compounds, this platelet enzyme has also been applied as peripheral biomarker of monoamine neurotransmission in patients exposed to neurotoxicants such as styrene [27] or environmental Hg [28].
Effect of aspartame on oxidative stress and monoamine neurotransmitter levels lipopolysaccharide -treated mice.
This behavioral change is sensitive to major classes of antidepressant drugs even when administered acutely, including monoamine oxidase inhibitors, tricyclics, selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitors, and atypicals (9,18,20).
Aim of this study was to test the monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition activity of the same AFA extract and of its constituents phycocyanin (AFA-PC) and mycosporine-like aminoacids (AFA-MAAs).