monkshood


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Related to monkshood: Aconitum, foxglove

ac·o·nite

(ak'ō-nīt),
The dried root of Aconitum napellus (family Ranunculaceae), commonly known as monkshood or wolfsbane; a powerful and rapid-acting poison formerly used as an antipyretic, diuretic, diaphoretic, anodyne, cardiac and respiratory depressant, and externally as an analgesic.

aconite

Herbal medicine
An alkaloid derived from the plant by the same name, which formerly had currency as a medicinal herb; given aconite’s toxicity, it is no longer used in herbal medicine.

Toxicity
Abdominal pain, anxiety, blurred vision, bradycardia, burning sensation, cardiac arrhythmias, chest pain, diaphoresis, dyspnoea, impaired speech, muscular weakness, nausea, paresthesias, vertigo, vomiting, and possibly death due to respiratory failure or ventricular fibrillation.

Management
Gastric lavage, atropine, digitalis.
 
Homeopathy
A homeopathic remedy for treating swelling, fever, infections, restlessness, anxiety and panic attacks, and parasthesias; it has also been used for anginal pain, arrhythmias, arthritis, asthma, bronchitis, respiratory infections, laryngitis, sore throat, toothaches. In homeopathy, aconite’s concentration is extremely low, thus reducing its potential toxicity.

ac·o·nite

(ak'ŏ-nīt)
The dried root of Aconitum napellus (family Ranunculaceae), commonly known as wolfsbane; a powerful and rapid-acting poison formerly used as an antipyretic, diuretic, diaphoretic, anodyne, cardiac and respiratory depressant, and externally as an analgesic.
Synonym(s): fu tzu, monkshood.
[L. aconitum, fr. G. akoniton]
References in periodicals archive ?
The final shot of the film confirms what Brigitte announced in renewing her blood oath: "Now I am you." The film's sequel (Ginger Snaps II: Unleashed) will challenge the veracity of that statement, as Brigitte struggles to live without succumbing to her lycanthropy, treating it as a chronic condition that can be controlled with regular injections of monkshood, and telling the taunting ghost of Ginger that she--Brigitte--is the "stronger" of the two sisters.
* PLANT FLOWERS like Sedum spectabile, Monkshood and Goldenrod that start in late summer and keep going into autumn.
As the historian Ishii shows, the Thai state made great efforts in replacing the indigenous monkshood with a system of regulated monasteries tied to the centre of Thai power, even as that shifted from Ayuthhaya to Thonburi (Ishii 1986).
Many stars of pale-lavender gentian, touched with earth-colour: and then monkshood, yellow primrose monkshood, and sudden places full of dark monkshood.
Monkshood (William James Clarke), and books by various authors on Bret Harte, Swinburne, Arthur Wing Pinero, Hall Caine, and George Meredith.
of Georgia, Athens) presents basic information on some 630 species and cultivars from Acontium (monkshood) to Zizia aurea (golden Alexanders).
Monkshood (Aconitum) - They are often planted under trees or spring flowering shrubs at the back of a border, bearing tall spikes of helmeted flowers in blues and purples in the summer.
HV Plants include: BANANA, CALABASH, JACARANDA, MARRAM GRASS, SASSAFRAS, EVERGREEN, SPEEDWELL, IRIS, COTTONWOOD, DOGWOOD, MONKSHOOD, FUNGUS
Noble died after coming in contact with the poisonous monkshood plant while on a hike in Newfoundland.
In case we thought that dread was something distinctively modern, Adrienne Mayor reminds us in GREEK FIRE, POISION ARROW & SCORPION OMBS: BIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL WARFARE IN THE ANCIENT WORLD (Overlook Press, $27.95) that serpent venom, toxic honey, monkshood, black hellebore, deadly nightshade, yew berries, frog toxin, rhododendron sap, stingray spine, jellyfish, dung beetles, and bug guts (not to mention rabies, anthrax, smallpox, curare, and bubonic plague) have, from antique times, been smeared on arrows, spears, swords, and blowgun darts, or shot out of catapults during sieges, or used to poison crops and well, by everybodv from Alexander the Great to the Holy Crusaders, including Hittites, Scythians, Spartans, Trojans, Romans, Persians, Hindus, Muslims, and Marcus Aurelius.
The Northern wild monkshood (Aconitum noveboracense), a threatened plant, also grows on these sites.
According to the closing argument, Take conspired with the three to take out an insurance policy on Shuichi Sato, a 45-year-old unemployed man, and fatally poisoned him at his home in Hongo, Saitama, with a Japanese sweet-bean bun spiked with monkshood herb in June 1995.