mongolian spot


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

mongolian spot

 [mon-gōl´e-an]
a smooth, brown to grayish blue nevus consisting of an excess of melanocytes, typically found at birth in the sacral region in East Asians, Blacks, American Indians, and many southern Europeans; it usually disappears during childhood.

mon·go·li·an spot

any of a number of dark-bluish or mulberry-colored rounded or oval spots on the sacral region due to the ectopic presence of scattered melanocytes in the dermis. These congenital lesions are frequent in black, native American, and Asian children from 2-12 years, after which time they gradually recede; they do not disappear on pressure and are sometimes mistaken for bruises from child abuse.
Synonym(s): blue spot (2)

mongolian spot

Mongolian spot Dermatology A large slate-gray–due to the Tyndall effect–macule with variable margins, usually over the presacral regions, posterior thighs, legs, back, shoulders, most common in blacks and Asians, less in whites, often fading with age–persisting in 4% of Japanese adolescents Clinical significance None

mon·go·li·an spot

(mon-gō'lē-ăn spot)
Any of a number of dark-bluish or mulberry-colored rounded or oval spots on the skin in the sacral region due to the ectopic presence of scattered melanocytes in the dermis. These congenital lesions are frequent in black, Native American, and Asian children from 2-12 years of age after which time they gradually recede; they do not disappear on pressure and are sometimes mistaken for bruises from child abuse.
Synonym(s): blue spot (2) .
Enlarge picture
MONGOLIAN SPOTS

mongolian spot

Any of the blue or mulberry-colored spots usually located in the sacral region. It may be present at birth in Asian, American Indian, black, and Southern European infants and usually disappears during childhood.
Synonym: blue spot See: illustration
See also: spot

Mongolian spot

A bluish-black pigmented birthmark (NAEVUS) occurring on the buttocks or lower part of the back, especially in coloured children. Mongolian spots are caused by a local accumulation of the normal skin pigment (melanin). They have usually disappeared by the age of about 4.
References in periodicals archive ?
Frequency and characteristics of Mongolian spots among Turkish children in Aegean region.
Extensive mongolian spots with involvement of the scalp.
Most of the lesions of Mongolian spots, recession of hair, sebaceous hyperplasia, sparse hair, Epstein's pearls, pigmentation of linea alba, milia, dense hair and breast hypertrophy appeared on the first day.
Mongolian spots (698) and lesions of Developmental defects (202) remained even after one week.
Mongolian spots and naeveus fllammeus were more frequent in NBW neonates.
(7) Melanocytic (pigmented) birthmarks were more frequent than vascular ones in our study and the most common pigmented birthmarks were Mongolian spots in 70 neonates, a frequency of 11.7%.
Mongolian spots were the most frequent skin condition, noted in 632 (63.2%) neonates.
In our study, Mongolian spots, Epstein pearls, sebaceous

Full browser ?