momism


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mom·ism

(mom'izm),
A term relating to excessive or overbearing mothering, especially as attributed to U.S. cultural stereotypes.

momism

(mŏm′ĭzm) [Coined by Phillip Wylie in his book A Generation of Vipers]
In American culture, undue dependence on one's mother, esp. in very early life. This was alleged to cause the individual to be immature.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, media depictions of the new momism are also helpful in understanding SoA.
Susan Douglas and Meredith Michaels have termed the twenty-first century manifestation of this ideology the 'New Momism' which, as they explain, begins with:
This new momism seeks to eradicate hard won social changes brought about by feminism.
(253) In 1993 when the FMLA was enacted, the country was at the height of new momism, according to Susan J.
A number of recent texts have addressed topics such as "the new momism," "intensive mothering," "motherguilt" and the inherent contradictions in a capitalist society that nonetheless promotes a vision of motherhood that is at odds with the ever increasing pressure to work longer hours and make more money.
Corber explains that, "with the outbreak of the Cold War, momism became linked to the spread of communism in the national political imaginary and led to the creation of a demonology of motherhood" (197).
Cultural critics Susan Douglas and Meredith Michaels call it the "new momism." Since the 1980s, mothers have been subjected to an increasingly ridiculous mythology of what a good mother does, and is.
Hendershot's discussion of the American movement, popularly known as Momism, and her discussion of the femme fatale in the role of Soviet agent, would probably have reached similar conclusions to Theweleit: that fear and dread of the feminine develop into a hatred and repression of the feminine element because it weakens the fighting spirit, makes men too emotionally vulnerable and therefore uncontrollable.
Surfacing at a time when manifestos are out of style and mass market fiction featuring the antics of the working morn, such as Allison Pearson's I Don't Know How She Does It, is decidedly in, The Mommy Myth is a wise-cracking indictment of what the authors call "the new momism": a set of ideals that daily assault and guilt-trip women by tacitly insisting that, to be fulfilled, they must have children and be their primary caretakers.
In his 1942 best-seller Generation of Vipers, Philip Wylie coined the term "momism" to describe how passive-aggressive American mothers disempowered their husbands and smothered their children with attention.
Muller offers helpful information on the United States during and after World War I, on the sociocultural environment dominated by the American matriarchal middle-class family, by "Momism" and on the importance of middle-class Protestantism.
[And somehow the world has forgotten "momism" of several generations back;