momism


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

mom·ism

(mom'izm),
A term relating to excessive or overbearing mothering, especially as attributed to U.S. cultural stereotypes.

momism

(mŏm′ĭzm) [Coined by Phillip Wylie in his book A Generation of Vipers]
In American culture, undue dependence on one's mother, esp. in very early life. This was alleged to cause the individual to be immature.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, media depictions of the new momism are also helpful in understanding SoA.
For me the most worrisome part of the New Momism, particularly as it is manifested in the motherhood memoir, is that being a stay-at-home mother is constructed as the mother's choice.
The values of new momism are echoed in the assumptions and effects of the FMLA.
Since then, new momism has been gaining currency in the United States, and let them tell you, it's everywhere: Contributors include the media's evergreen coverage of the "mommy wars" (fought mama-a-mama with all the real-world veracity of the WWE); sensational and unrepresentative news coverage of mothers and children; the toy industry; the celebrity-mom profile--a women's magazine staple; and the childcare expert establishment, starring, among others, Benjamin Spock, William Sears and Laura "I Am My Kid's (Judgmental, Scary, Right-Wing) Mom" Schlessinger.
Ultimately, Douglas and Michaels urge readers to learn "to name the new momism every time and everywhere you see it, to ridicule it (preferably out loud, in front of others)," as they have done, relentlessly, in print.
In a plot twist reminiscent of Philip Wylie's attacks on momism, the Communists' evil pawn was the mother of one of the soldiers.
Michaels articulate and analyze what they call "the new momism," a cultural discourse that insists "that no woman is truly complete or fulfilled unless she has kids, that women remain the best primary caretakers of children, and that to be a remotely decent mother, a woman has to devote her entire physical, psychological, emotional, and intellectual being, 24/7, to her children" (4).
As Rebecca Jo Plant, "The Repeal of Mother Love: Momism and the Reconstruction of Motherhood in Philip Wylie's America" (Ph.
Her book Bringing Up Mommy: The Media and the Rise of the "New Momism," written with Meredith Michaels, will be published next year by Crown.
2] While the explicit message of Breeder is a feminist celebration of reproductive choices, the text also asserts that young (counterculture) women, typically assumed too financially unstable to parent, participate in what Douglas and Michaels term "the new Momism," and, as choice-making consumers, are thus culturally acceptable mothers.
Moreover, many social scientists (with the conspicuous absence of academic psychologists) have used psychoanalysis as a resource for making sense of the social upheavals of the century, especially those involving gender relations, sexuality and family life - flappers, escalating divorce rates, the "Black Matriarchy," Momism, male homosexuality, working mothers and "latch-key" children, and, of course, feminism.
Rebecca Plant, "The Repeal of Mother-Love: Momism and the Reconstruction of Motherhood in Philip Wylie's America," Ph.