molt


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molt

(mōlt),
To cast off feathers, hair, or cuticle; to undergo ecdysis.
See also: desquamate.
Synonym(s): moult
[L. muto, to change]

molt

(mōlt)
v. molted, molting, molts
v.intr.
To shed part or all of a coat or an outer covering, such as feathers, cuticle, or skin, which is then replaced by a new growth.
v.tr.
To shed or cast off (a bodily covering).
n.
1. The act or process of molting.
2. The material cast off during molting.

molt′er n.

molt

(mōlt)
To cast off feathers, hair, or cuticle; to undergo ecdysis.
[L. muto, to change]

molt

the physiological shedding of the integument, usually annual, and at the beginning of the breeding season, including the shedding of the skin by reptiles, of hair by many species, and of feathers by birds; the phenomenon is gradual, has severe metabolic overtones and leaves the bird flightless and off lay for several weeks. It is assumed to be related to hormonal changes related to changes in the length of daylight hours.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, molt increment was not significantly different in any treatment and the time to molt was only significantly different in molt 3 for the small cage size between the intermediate and low ration (Tukey's HSD P < 0.
We located specimens of 1 complete and 1 apparently incomplete family group collected in July 1920 and July 1948, which supplemented information on wing molt of chick-rearing Ancient Murrelets.
The linear mixed model is a generalization of the more familiar analysis of variance that allows for relaxation of 2 of its key assumptions: that the data points are all independent and that the variability within each of the experimental groups (here the molt, nonmolt, and postmolt groups) is equal.
Young male animals after the fifth molt were selected based on anatomical position of the palps.
Results might have differed if more males had been implanted, as male sea ducks often molt several hundred kilometres from their breeding sites (Salomonsen, 1968; Brodeur et al.
We detected at least one individual of each species undergoing active molt with exception of the warbling vireo and black-headed grosbeak.
The scorpion molts used in this study were donated by arachnid hobbyists; live scorpions were purchased through a commercial supplier (www.
05) higher when measured on Day 7 compared to before molt indicating that fasting elevated this variable.
1995) showed that sphyrion tag loss for lobsters held in aquaria varies between 3% and 23% depending on the molt stage at tagging.
Lobsters begin to molt, shedding their hard shells to grow new ones.
Autotomy of limbs stimulates ecdysis (molt), and it is difficult to assess whether changes in molt are due to this physiologic response or to PAH effects.