molecule


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molecule

 [mol´ĕ-kūl]
a group of atoms joined by chemical bonds; the smallest amount of a substance that possesses its characteristic properties.
adhesion m's (cell adhesion m's (CAM)) cell surface glycoproteins that mediate intercell adhesion in vertebrates.
middle molecule any molecule that has an atomic mass between 350 and 2000 daltons; these accumulate in the body fluids of patients with uremia.

mol·e·cule

(mol'ĕ-kyūl),
The smallest possible quantity of a di-, tri-, or polyatomic substance that retains the chemical properties of the substance.
[Mod. L. molecula, dim. of L. moles, mass]

molecule

/mol·e·cule/ (mol´ĕ-kūl) a small mass of matter; the smallest amount of a substance which can exist alone; an aggregation of atoms, specifically a chemical combination of two or more atoms forming a specific chemical substance.molec´ular

molecule

[mol′əkyo̅o̅l]
Etymology: L, molecula, small mass
the smallest unit that exhibits the properties of an element or compound. A molecule is composed of two or more atoms that are covalently bonded. See also atom, compound.

molecule

The smallest unit of a substance that can exist alone and retain its core chemical and physical characteristics.

trivial name

A popular, working, or common name for a thing or process that has a formal name. See CD, DSM-IV, EC, SI.
Trivial name
Disease–eg, Lou Gehrig's disease for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
Molecule–eg, Teflon for polytetrafluoroethylene
Organ–eg, anterior pituitary for adenohypophysis
Structure–eg, vocal cord for vocal fold–plica vocalis, or fallopian tube for tuba uterina, which is not standard nomenclature or based on 'official' rules delineated by international agencies or organizations–eg, American Psychiatric Association, Enzyme Commission, the International System, Terminologia Anatomica, etc

mol·e·cule

(mol'ĕ-kyūl)
The smallest possible quantity of a di-, tri-, or polyatomic substance that retains the chemical properties of the substance.

molecule

the smallest chemical unit of matter that has the characteristics of the substance of which it forms a part.

molecule,

n the smallest unit of a chemical compound; comprises atoms joined with chemical bonds. See also atom and compound.

mol·e·cule

(mol'ĕ-kyūl)
The smallest possible quantity of a di-, tri-, or polyatomic substance that retains the chemical properties of the substance.

molecule,

n a unit of matter that is the smallest particle of an element or chemical combination of atoms (as a compound) capable of retaining chemical identity with the substance in mass.

molecule

a group of atoms joined by chemical bonds; the smallest amount of a substance that possesses its characteristic properties.
References in periodicals archive ?
In contrast, at high altitudes, where the atmosphere is less dense, collisions between gas molecules are infrequent.
New treatments, now under development, aim at blocking the functions of the T-cell receptor and the CD28 molecule in order to dampen attacks on the nervous system.
Sugar is a molecule made of -- atoms of hydrogen, -- atoms of carbon, and -- atoms of oxygen.
Being a complicated molecule, it's also quite delicate.
The goals of single molecule research are to observe the dynamic behavior of individual molecules, to explore heterogeneity among molecules, and to determine mechanisms of action.
For uncrosslinked rubbers stretched slowly, the ability to stretch occurs partly because long molecules or chains slip past one another.
An assembler would physically grab onto a molecule, taking it from the pallet or conveyor belt or wherever, bring it to the piece of meat under construction, and mechanically force the molecule into position.
Patent expansions included AAGP(TM) molecules ranging from the very smallest (320 daltons) single amino acid based molecule through to the largest (2.
Most water-soluble (polar molecules that stick to water) polymers--like those in hair gel--dry to a rigid state.
Gross and his colleagues used an STM tip to shove the new molecule around on a copper surface.
To understand how this absorption generates heat, you need to take a "look" at the smallest bits of water--water molecules.
The Institute for Systems Biology is very excited to begin applying the capabilities of true single molecule sequencing technology in the area of cancer research.