molecule


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molecule

 [mol´ĕ-kūl]
a group of atoms joined by chemical bonds; the smallest amount of a substance that possesses its characteristic properties.
adhesion m's (cell adhesion m's (CAM)) cell surface glycoproteins that mediate intercell adhesion in vertebrates.
middle molecule any molecule that has an atomic mass between 350 and 2000 daltons; these accumulate in the body fluids of patients with uremia.

mol·e·cule

(mol'ĕ-kyūl),
The smallest possible quantity of a di-, tri-, or polyatomic substance that retains the chemical properties of the substance.
[Mod. L. molecula, dim. of L. moles, mass]

molecule

The smallest unit of a substance that can exist alone and retain its core chemical and physical characteristics.

trivial name

A popular, working, or common name for a thing or process that has a formal name. See CD, DSM-IV, EC, SI.
Trivial name
Disease–eg, Lou Gehrig's disease for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
Molecule–eg, Teflon for polytetrafluoroethylene
Organ–eg, anterior pituitary for adenohypophysis
Structure–eg, vocal cord for vocal fold–plica vocalis, or fallopian tube for tuba uterina, which is not standard nomenclature or based on 'official' rules delineated by international agencies or organizations–eg, American Psychiatric Association, Enzyme Commission, the International System, Terminologia Anatomica, etc

mol·e·cule

(mol'ĕ-kyūl)
The smallest possible quantity of a di-, tri-, or polyatomic substance that retains the chemical properties of the substance.

molecule

the smallest chemical unit of matter that has the characteristics of the substance of which it forms a part.

mol·e·cule

(mol'ĕ-kyūl)
The smallest possible quantity of a di-, tri-, or polyatomic substance that retains the chemical properties of the substance.
References in periodicals archive ?
During the transition from weakly bound--when the two atoms are loosely linked and still vibrating internally with energy--to a tightly bound molecule in its ground state, a lot of energy is released.
It is possible that completely blocking the function of any given immune system molecule could stop the system so profoundly that unwanted infections would develop.
"But there hasn't been as much insight into the similarities that might exist that link all of these diverse groups of molecules."
Quick cooling doesn't give the sucrose molecules time to regroup.
Being a complicated molecule, it's also quite delicate.
When properly aligned, the molecules inside an LCD turn pixels on and off by twisting and rotating in response to electronic signals sent by the computer processor.
For one thing, the molecule had an undeniable aesthetic appeal: "It is literally the roundest of round molecules." said Smalley, "the most symmetric molecule possible in three-dimensional Euclidean space."
In contrast, at high altitudes, where the atmosphere is less dense, collisions between gas molecules are infrequent.
The goals of single molecule research are to observe the dynamic behavior of individual molecules, to explore heterogeneity among molecules, and to determine mechanisms of action.
Gross and his colleagues used an STM tip to shove the new molecule around on a copper surface.
By targeting the carbon-carbon double bond, which is usually difficult to break, metathesis reactions provide "a new way to link molecules together," says Ronald Breslow, a chemist at Columbia University and Grubbs' Ph.D.