molecular biology

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biology

 [bi-ol´o-je]
scientific study of living organisms. adj., adj biolog´ic, biolog´ical.
molecular biology study of molecular structures and events underlying biological processes, including relation between genes and the functional characteristics they determine.
radiation biology scientific study of the effects of ionizing radiation on living organisms.

mo·lec·u·lar bi·ol·o·gy

study of phenomena in terms of biology molecular (or chemical) interactions; traditionally, the focus of molecular biology is more specific than biochemistry in that it has an emphasis on chemical interactions involved in the replication of DNA, its "transcription" into RNA, and its "translation" into or expression in protein, that is, in the chemical reactions connecting genotype and phenotype.

molecular biology

n.
The branch of biology that deals with the structure, function, and manipulation of nucleic acids and proteins.

molecular biologist n.

molecular biology

A major discipline that marked its birth with Watson and Crick's seminal report, 'General Implications of the Structure of Deoxyribonucleic Acid', which elucidated the double helical nature of DNA; MB seeks to understand the mechanisms controlling gene expression, in physiologic and disease states, and provide the tools necessary for treating genetic diseases. See DNA, Human Genome Project.

mo·lec·u·lar bi·ol·o·gy

(mŏ-lekyū-lăr bī-olŏ-jē)
Study of phenomena in terms of molecular interactions; it differs from biochemistry in that it emphasizes chemical interactions involved in the replication of DNA, its "transcription" into RNA, and its "translation" into or expression in protein.

molecular biology

The study of cellular phenomena, and especially genetics, at a molecular or chemical level. As knowledge has progressed the term has become more and more synonymous with ‘biology’, for, today, biology aims at nothing less than a full understanding of the functioning of living things in terms of the nature and interactions of their molecules.

molecular biology

the study of the structure and function of MOLECULES of biological importance, such as NUCLEIC ACIDS and PROTEINS.

mo·lec·u·lar bi·ol·o·gy

(mŏ-lekyū-lăr bī-olŏ-jē)
Study of phenomena in terms of molecular interactions.
References in periodicals archive ?
UCLA molecular biologists have turned protein sequences into original compositions of classical music.
Over the past 2 decades, the CDC community has become increasingly multidisciplinary, embracing molecular biologists, geneticists, bioinformatics specialists, statisticians/mathematicians, behavioral and social scientists, modelers, economists, and other scholars.
For additional information, visit Compugen's Corporate Web Site at http://www.cgen.com and the company's Internet research engine for molecular biologists, http://www.LabOnWeb.com.
In addition, Compugen provides these products and services to molecular biologists and other life scientists through its LabOnWeb.com Web site.
Aimed at working molecular biologists, yet accessible to students, this guide covers the fundamentals of making quantitative measurements of biological binding reactions.
Many mentioned that the methods, software, and hardware necessary to handle the massive amounts of data were being developed but were relatively new to most molecular biologists. In addition to the sheer quantity of data generated by toxicogenomics assays, many respondents also expressed concerns that the quality of data was a barrier.
Through its LabOnWeb.com Web site, Compugen has begun to provide certain components of its platforms to individual molecular biologists and other life scientists worldwide.
This timely book presents basic toxicology for molecular biologists and &tailed approaches and methods of gene expression, protein, and metabolic global analyses for toxicologists and others learning to use such methods.
Compugen's computational and biological capabilities are based on a multi-disciplinary research team consisting of mathematicians, computer scientists, and molecular biologists.
In a step forward into the future of gene expression research, molecular biologists and neurobiologists have joined forces to map the genes that control brain structure and neural circuits.

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