moderate periodontitis


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moderate periodontitis

Periodontitis in which moderate bone loss and pocket formation are accompanied by abnormal tooth mobility.
See also: periodontitis
References in periodicals archive ?
In NDM subjects, the concentration of TNF-[alpha] in the nonperiodontitis group was significantly higher than in the mild periodontitis group (P = 0.002, Table 5 and Figure 2(c)) and the moderate periodontitis group (P < 0.001).
The available diagnoses found on the patient charts include: gingivitis, slight periodontitis, moderate periodontitis, and advanced periodontitis.
Patients with advanced and moderate periodontitis were on the average older (48 years) than the control patients (45.5 yrs); this difference was significant (Table 1) with females predominating.
Out of 120 individuals with good glycaemic control, 65 subjects (54.2%) had no clinical attachment loss; 47 subject (39.2%) had slight periodontitis; 8 (6.7%) had moderate periodontitis and none had severe periodontitis.
So patients with moderate periodontitis should receive non-surgical therapy to halt periodontal disease and limit the extent of surgical intervention needed in the future.
Moderate periodontitis was seen in 17.5% of the 35-44 years group; and 21.4%, in the 65-74 years group; whereas severe disease, defined as at least one tooth with [greater than or equal to] 6 mm probing depth, was seen in 7.8% in the 35- 44 years group and 18.1% in the 65-74 years group.
Mean pocket depth for each subgroup showed that all subgroups had moderate periodontitis but when that added to mean gingival recession, the attachment loss was about 7mm i.e.
* Moderate Periodontitis: Mean CAL [greater than or equal to] 1.6 mm to 2.4 mm and [less than or equal to] 8 sites with interproximal CAL [greater than or equal to] 3 mm distributed through at least 3 quadrants or at least 6 teeth.
Many studies have shown high success rates with NSPT in successful treatment of mild to moderate periodontitis. (2)
(51) Based primarily on the severity of attachment loss, the patient was classified into 1 of 4 categories: case type I: gingivitis, case type II: slight (early) periodontitis, case type III: moderate periodontitis or case type IV: advanced (severe) periodontitis (Table I).
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