model

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model

 [mod´'l]
1. something that represents or simulates something else; a replica.
2. a reasonable facsimile of the body or any of its parts; used for demonstration and teaching purposes.
3. to initiate another's behavior; see modeling.
4. a hypothesis or theory.
5. in nursing theory, an abstract conceptual framework used to organize knowledge and serve as a guide for observation and interpretation; see also conceptual model.
articulation m's a process of educational mobility in which programs work together to enable students to progress between levels of nursing education programs with the fewest possible barriers and repetitions of content.
conceptual model see conceptual model.
PLISSIT model a progressive design of sexual counseling that contains the four steps of permission, limited information, specific suggestions, and intensive therapy.

mod·el

(mod'ĕl),
1. A representation of something, often idealized or modified to make it conceptually easier to understand.
2. Something to be imitated.
3. In dentistry, a cast.
4. A mathematic representation of a particular phenomenon.
5. An animal that is used to mimic a pathologic condition.
[It. midello, fr. L. modus, measure, standard]

model

(mŏd′l)
n.
1. A small object, usually built to scale, that represents in detail another, often larger object.
2. A schematic description or representation of something, especially a system or phenomenon, that accounts for its properties and is used to study its characteristics: a model of generative grammar; a model of an atom; an economic model.
adj.
Being, serving as, or used as a model.
v. mod·eled, mod·eling, mod·els also mod·elled or mod·elling
v.tr.
1. To make or construct a descriptive or representational model of: computer programs that model climate change.
2. Psychology
a. To exhibit (a behavior) in such a way as to promote the establishment of similar patterns of behavior in another: The therapist modeled socially appropriate conversation.
b. To repeat (a behavior observed in another): The child was modeling her mother's nurturing behavior.
v.intr.
To make a model.

mod′el·er n.

model

EBM
A formal framework for representing and analysing a process (e.g.,  a clinical trial) or data relevant to a process.

model

A conceptual representation of a thing or concept. See Acucare model, Age-structured model, Animal model, Biopsychosocial model, Brownian rachet model, Civil defense model, Coalescence model, Compartment model, Component object model, Conceptual model, Conflagration model, Coronary Heart Disease Policy model, Danger model, David Eddy cervical cancer model, Demand model, Deterministic model, Discrete time model, Disney model, Effector inhibition model, Emergency Medical Services model, Event model, Extrapolation model, Five factor model, Fixed effects model, Failure rate model, Frailty model, Framework model, Group model, Hebbian model, HMO model, Hobson model, Homo economicus model, Independent Practice Association model, K Mart model, Kirk model, Linear model, Mathematical model, Mouse model, MPM–mortalities probability model, Needs model, Open access model, Partnership model, Point-of-service model, Prediction model, Prevalence model, Process model, Pyramid model, Radial unit model, Remodeling model, Risk adjustment model, RITARD model, Scissors grip model, SEIR model, Self-nonself model, Sinclair swine model, Sliding filament model, Staff model, Supply model, Three-tiered model, Two-tiered model.

mod·el

(mod'ěl)
1. A representation of something, often idealized or modified to make it conceptually easier to understand.
2. Something to be imitated.
3. dentistry A cast.
4. A mathematical representation of a particular phenomenon.
5. An animal that is used to mimic a pathologic condition.
[It. midello, fr. L. modus, measure, standard]

mod·el

(mod'ěl)
1. In dentistry, a cast.
2. A representation of something.
[It. midello, fr. L. modus, measure, standard]

Patient discussion about model

Q. how can models function without eating? whenever I skip lunch I find that I am not feeling well by the afternoon, and according to a magazine I read they basically live on ice(!), diet coke, champaign and cigarettes…

A. Champaign (as all alcoholic drinks) actually contains a significant amount of calories... :-) No one can function with out eating AT ALL, but they do get more used to eating LESS, and their body adjust itself (i.e. uses the food more efficiently) - it's harmful and may damage them in the short and long term, but it's possible.

More discussions about model
References in periodicals archive ?
A company can determine model risk exposures by defining what a model is, creating and maintaining an inventory of models, and categorizing the models into low, medium and high risk with due consideration for materiality.
Building on Reiter's innovation, Griffeath and Gravner have now used yet another variation on cellular automata, known as a coupled-lattice map, to model snowflakes.
Using the DoDAF, operational activities are often modeled using integrated definition (IDEF) methods, specifically the IDEFO (pronounced IDEF-zero) function modeling method.
Blenders were another major category of products at NPE, and several vendors added larger models to their lines.
The model of social, self-direction has been under a constant iteration process.
"We had adopted Black-Scholes but now believe a lattice model is appropriate for valuing options," Nagel said.
The 2086, with 2,600- pound rated capacity, is Mustang's first model in this size range.
Their research highlighted the need for models that would enable investigation of tumor promotion.
The narrative provided by the authors indicates a very powerful and emotional group experience for the African-American girls participating in the Empowerment Groups for Academic Success (EGAS) model. Moreover, the EGAS model is described as a very strategic intervention procedure for the African American females involved in the study.
Although stainless steel handguns often have a brighter, more reflective appearance than those with dark finishes, some models have a matte finish to reduce glare.
For instance, if modeling is going to help identify and focus on the decisions likely to have the largest effects on outcomes, the models must address actual decisions to be made in actual bioterrorism events.
Goodfriend shows that the resulting macroeconomic equilibrium is considerably more complex than that obtained in traditional, greatly simplified monetary models. For instance, among the standard factors determining the observed net real returns on capital and bonds is the time preference of agents--the rate at which agents trade consumption today for consumption tomorrow.

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