modality


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Related to modality: treatment modality

modality

 [mo-dal´ĭ-te]
1. in homeopathy, a condition that modifies drug action; a condition under which symptoms develop, becoming better or worse.
2. a method of application of, or the employment of, any therapeutic agent; limited usually to physical agents.
3. a specific sensory entity, such as taste.

mo·dal·i·ty

(mō-dal'i-tē), Avoid the jargonistic use of this word as a synonym of method or treatment.
1. A form of application or employment of a therapeutic agent or regimen.
2. Various forms of sensation, for example, touch, vision, etc.
[Mediev. L. modalitas, fr. L. modus, a mode]

modality

/mo·dal·i·ty/ (mo-dal´ĭ-te)
1. a method of application of, or the employment of, any therapeutic agent, especially a physical agent.
2. in homeopathy, a condition that modifies drug action; a condition under which symptoms develop, becoming better or worse.
3. a specific sensory entity, such as taste.

modality

(mō-dăl′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. modali·ties
1. Medicine A therapeutic method or agent, such as surgery, chemotherapy, or electrotherapy, that involves the physical treatment of a disorder.
2. Physiology Any of the various types of sensation, such as vision or hearing.

modality

[mōdal′itē]
1 the method of application of a therapeutic agent or regimen.
2 a sensory entity, such as the sense of vision or taste.

modality

Homeopathy
A general term for any factor that alleviates or aggravates a main symptom as an expression of the uniqueness of the individual.

Examples
Chest pain worsened by heat, by sitting, or at night.
 
Oncology
A manner or type of therapy, such as teletherapy, brachytherapy, hyperthermia and stereotactic radiation.

mo·dal·i·ty

(mō-dal'i-tē)
1. A form of application or employment of a therapeutic agent or regimen.
2. Various forms of sensation, e.g., touch, vision.
[Mediev. L. modalitas, fr. L. modus, a mode]

modality

1. A type or mode, especially of sensation, of the senses or of medical treatment.
2. A quality that denotes mode, mood or manner.

Modality

A factor or circumstance that makes a patient's symptoms better or worse. Modalities include such factors as time of day, room temperature, the patient's level of activity, sleep patterns, etc.
Mentioned in: Ipecac

modality

any form of therapeutic intervention

modality

denoting a specific sensation, e.g. touch, pressure, vibration Table 1
Table 1: Tests of sensory evaluation of the lower limb
Sensory modalityTests used to evaluate modality
Vibration128-Hz tuning fork
Rydel-Seiffer tuning fork
Biothesiometer
TouchCotton wool
Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments
Neurotip (plastic end)
PainNeurotip (metal end)
Weight of tip of hypodermic needle affixed to a 2-ml plastic syringe filled with water
Algometer
Protective painAwareness of the contact of the tip of a 10-G
Semmes-Weinstein monofilament at the majority of the plantar surface
Awareness of the contact of the tip of a 4-G
Semmes-Weinstein monofilament at the majority of the dorsal surface
Blunt/sharpNeurotip (plastic end) + Neurotip (metal end)
HotTest-tube filled with hot water
ColdTest-tube filled with cold water
Tyne of tuning fork
ProprioceptionThe examiner moves a joint and the patient identifies the direction of movement

Sensory evaluation should be carried out in a systematic manner with the results recorded on an appropriate form that is retained in the patient's case notes. All areas of the foot are tested. The patient should be unable to observe the tester's actions, and lies in a relaxed and comfortable position. Repeat tests should be made and recorded, e.g. every 6-12 months, and where possible retests should be carried out at the same time of day by the same tester.

modality,

n 1. the technique of applying a therapeutic regimen or agent.
2. a particular sense, such as the sense of vision.

modality

One of the types of sensation (e.g. vision). The term is usually used to specify the sense (e.g. the visual modality, the touch modality).

mo·dal·i·ty

(mō-dal'i-tē)
1. A form of application or employment of a therapeutic agent or regimen.
2. Various forms of sensation.
[Mediev. L. modalitas, fr. L. modus, a mode]

modality

1. a method of application of, or the employment of, any therapeutic agent; limited usually to physical agents.
2. a specific sensory entity, such as taste.
3. in homeopathy, a condition that modifies drug action; a condition under which clinical signs develop, becoming better or worse.

Patient discussion about modality

Q. I would like to know the modality of treatments available for breast cancer. Can anyone explain me? My best friend is 30yrs, female. She is just diagnosed with breast cancer. Her doctor said that she is in the initial stage and nothing serious. I would like to know the modality of treatments available for breast cancer. Can anyone explain me?

A. i'm sorry to hear...it's not easy to know a good friend of yours have cancer. all you need to know of a the newest and best treatments you can find right here:
http://www.breastcancer.org/treatment/index.jsp

good luck to you and your friend! and keep me posted.

More discussions about modality
References in periodicals archive ?
Modalities Composition Modality 1 Control, without nitrogen and potassium fertilization.
His remarks came after Iran's Residing Representative to the International Atomic Energy Agency Ali Asqar Soltaniyeh said earlier this week that the UN inspectors may be allowed to visit Parchin military site but only after Tehran and the IAEA finalize the framework of a modality plan for cooperation.
Under each category Callaham presents some or all of the texts employing the given modality that also contain an infinitive absolute; he gives the Hebrew, with the infinitive in bold, then a translation, with the verbal idea represented by the infinitive in bold and the modal nuance of the category in italics.
The organisation of this paper is as follows: we shall first examine modality.
Modality has been defined by many scholars in many different ways from linguistic as well as from philosophical viewpoints and is often described as the most difficult grammatical category to define (see Nieuwint 1992 : 1).
What we found was that the people for whom matched modality was important were the men--and that men who were matched on modality were 3.
As beneficial as electrotherapy interventions might be, each modality has its own unique set of limitations, which depends on each patient's condition.
This rise in increased learning with the addition of audio is known as the modality principle (Mayer, 2001).
A circle is being drawn, the groundwork is being laid for a new medicine that is not restricted by dogma to one modality.
This situation honors the preferred modality of all students, who, in turn, may demonstrate an increased interest in objectives being taught.
Neither population preferred learning by listening; in fact, auditory was the next-to-the last modality preferred by young children and the least preferred by secondary students.
It has been concluded that the best overall teaching modality was the auditory approach.