modality


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to modality: treatment modality

modality

 [mo-dal´ĭ-te]
1. in homeopathy, a condition that modifies drug action; a condition under which symptoms develop, becoming better or worse.
2. a method of application of, or the employment of, any therapeutic agent; limited usually to physical agents.
3. a specific sensory entity, such as taste.

mo·dal·i·ty

(mō-dal'i-tē), Avoid the jargonistic use of this word as a synonym of method or treatment.
1. A form of application or employment of a therapeutic agent or regimen.
2. Various forms of sensation, for example, touch, vision, etc.
[Mediev. L. modalitas, fr. L. modus, a mode]

modality

(mō-dăl′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. modali·ties
1. Medicine A therapeutic method or agent, such as surgery, chemotherapy, or electrotherapy, that involves the physical treatment of a disorder.
2. Physiology Any of the various types of sensation, such as vision or hearing.

modality

Homeopathy
A general term for any factor that alleviates or aggravates a main symptom as an expression of the uniqueness of the individual.

Examples
Chest pain worsened by heat, by sitting, or at night.
 
Oncology
A manner or type of therapy, such as teletherapy, brachytherapy, hyperthermia and stereotactic radiation.

mo·dal·i·ty

(mō-dal'i-tē)
1. A form of application or employment of a therapeutic agent or regimen.
2. Various forms of sensation, e.g., touch, vision.
[Mediev. L. modalitas, fr. L. modus, a mode]

modality

1. A type or mode, especially of sensation, of the senses or of medical treatment.
2. A quality that denotes mode, mood or manner.

Modality

A factor or circumstance that makes a patient's symptoms better or worse. Modalities include such factors as time of day, room temperature, the patient's level of activity, sleep patterns, etc.
Mentioned in: Ipecac

modality

One of the types of sensation (e.g. vision). The term is usually used to specify the sense (e.g. the visual modality, the touch modality).

mo·dal·i·ty

(mō-dal'i-tē)
1. A form of application or employment of a therapeutic agent or regimen.
2. Various forms of sensation.
[Mediev. L. modalitas, fr. L. modus, a mode]

Patient discussion about modality

Q. I would like to know the modality of treatments available for breast cancer. Can anyone explain me? My best friend is 30yrs, female. She is just diagnosed with breast cancer. Her doctor said that she is in the initial stage and nothing serious. I would like to know the modality of treatments available for breast cancer. Can anyone explain me?

A. i'm sorry to hear...it's not easy to know a good friend of yours have cancer. all you need to know of a the newest and best treatments you can find right here:
http://www.breastcancer.org/treatment/index.jsp

good luck to you and your friend! and keep me posted.

More discussions about modality
References in periodicals archive ?
Congruency analysis to describe the percentage of times that respondents were actually doing what they recommended was considered; however, we elected against this approach as it ignores the fact that more than one modality might be equally acceptable as the ideal treatment.
The text was delivered either in a written (visual-only modality) or oral (audiovisual modality) form depending from the participant's condition (between-subjects factor 'modality of information presentation').
Modality is a semantic category which has a strong relationship to the meaning of modals.
- Ultrasound (Imaging Modality) Market Share Shift by Company: 2019 & 2025
The service will be free at the point of use for Modality patients.
This 10% highlights cases in which non-invasive MV was the sole supportive treatment modality in ARDS.
In combined therapeutic modality IV, this percentage was 75% of cases.
That means that users are able to quickly learn and be productive on Modality without much practice.
Once the employed modalities are identified, the adversary's objectives and limitations assessed, and the required capabilities to accomplish these objectives revealed, a determination is made as to which modality (irregular, traditional, catastrophic, or disruptive/ criminal) is the enemy's main effort to accomplish those objectives.
The case of variables from one low-dimensional modality (typically, a few clinical variables relevant to the outcome to be predicted) and one high-dimensional modality (e.g., a microarray gene expression dataset) has been extensively investigated by De Bin et al.
Several factors have been attributed to the early decline in home modality use.
They were briefed about the meaning of VARK learning modalities to help them identify which modality they thought they used.