mobilize

(redirected from mobilisation)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

mo·bi·lize

(mō'bi-līz),
1. To liberate material stored in the body; more specifically, to move a substance from tissue stores into the bloodstream.
2. To excite quiescent material to physiologic activity.
[Fr. mobiliser, to liberate, make ready, fr. L. mobilis, movable]

mobilize

(mō′bə-līz′)
v. mobi·lized, mobi·lizing, mobi·lizes
v.tr.
To release or make available, as cells or chemical substances: hormones that mobilize calcium from bones.

mo′bi·li·za′tion (-lĭ-zā′shən) n.

mobilize

(mō′bĭl-īz)
1. To incite to physiological action.
2. To render movable; to put in movement.
References in periodicals archive ?
'Let me commend the NYSC management for the choice of Nasarawa State to host the session preparatory to the staging of the 2019 Batch A mobilisation exercise,' he said.
Mrs Nnenna Ukonu, NYSC Director, Corps Mobilisations, said that the scheme observed recurrence of unwholesome practices and common errors associated with the mobilisation process.
'We intend to brainstorm with critical stakeholders and come up with lasting solutions to these issues that have hindered mobilisation process over the years as it concerns credible data collection and adherence to laid down policies.
I am optimistic that with your support, the scheme will surmount all obstacles at ensuring a hitch-free mobilisation process,' she said.
The most common barriers to mobilisation are summarised in Table 4.
All ICUs reported that nurses and physiotherapists were responsible for patient mobilisation. None of the ICUs had structured protocols in place regarding patient management (for example, using a standardised sedation scoring system) but some had guidelines related to documentation of patient goals, setting daily sedation goals for patients and assessment of patients' mobility status.
Table 5 summarises factors that had a relationship with mobilisation activities performed with patients in the ICU.
The centre announced on Wednesday it would appeal the conscription and mobilisation orders in court.
Early mobilisation of intensive care unit patient: the challenges of morbid obesity and multiorgan failure.
Early mobilisation versus immobilisation in the treatment of lateral ankle sprains.
The Sheffield Splint for controlled early mobilisation after rupture of the calcaneal tendon.
Early mobilisation versus immobilisation of surgically treated ankle fracture.