mnemonic

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an·am·nes·tic

(an'am-nes'tik),
1. Assisting the memory. Synonym(s): mnemonic
2. Relating to the medical history of a patient.
3. Related to boosting immunity by repeated vaccination.

mnemonic

(nĭ-mŏn′ĭk)
adj.
Relating to, assisting, or intended to assist the memory.
n.
A device, such as a formula or rhyme, used as an aid in remembering.

mne·mon′i·cal·ly adv.

mnemonic

Any linguistic device, such as a rhyme, song verse, formula, acronym or other, which is used to jog the memory.

Example
SADCHALETS—A UK mnemonic used in the context of a major incident (mass disaster) for the information that the first police officer or other person on the scene should relay to their control room:
• S—survey the scene;
• A—assess the scene;
• D—disseminate to those who need to know (police, fire, ambulance, highways, etc.);

• C—casualties (how many, seriousness);
• H—hazards (HAZCHEM, fire, etc.);
• A—access routes for emergency services;
• L—location (exact position and give accurate directions to control room);
• E—emergency services (liaise with others so they know what has been done or needs to be done);
• T—ype of incident (e.g., two vehicle injury etc.);
• S—scene log, if appropriate (e.g., life threatening).

mnemonic

Any artifice–eg, rhyme, formula, acronym, used to jog the memory

an·am·nes·tic

(an'am-nes'tik)
1. Assisting the memory.
Synonym(s): mnemonic.
2. Relating to the medical history of a patient.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition TM was also asked to learn the number matrix (8 x 6 items) used with other mnemonists (see Gordon et al., 1984) and recall it, then recall certain rows and columns in forward or reverse order.
The response string construct goes far towards handling claims mentioned above based on mnemonists who have developed extraordinary memory spans far in excess of seven, although many of the demonstrations depart very far from the simple memory span task.
This correspondence between material and mental libraries recurs in a too-brief allusion by Pliny the Elder, (12) who mentions the great mnemonists of Antiquity: `As for Charmadas of Greece, one could point to any volume in a library and he could recite it by heart, as though he were reading'.
An important alternative to the chunking theory was proposed by Chase, Ericsson and Staszewski (Chase & Ericsson, 1982; Ericsson & Staszewski, 1989; Staszewski, 1990), who supported their theory by detailed studies of mnemonists and experts in mental calculation.
For me, interviewing Tom and others represents an encounter between a historian and mnemonists and an opportunity to compare history as reconstructions of the past by trained specialists on the one hand and memory as recollections of things past in the minds of laymen on the other.
For example, I would suggest it is equally important to study the exceptional human capacities of prodigies, savants, mnemonists, multiples, and other dissociative virtuosi, the understanding of which is essential for generating and competently evaluating motivated psi alternatives to survival hypotheses; and that is an area in which I have done a good deal of work.
When we examine the lives of so-called mnemonists, it is tempting to describe their mnemonic ability, not as a gift or marvelous endowment, but as an affliction or a handicap.