mnemonic

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an·am·nes·tic

(an'am-nes'tik),
1. Assisting the memory. Synonym(s): mnemonic
2. Relating to the medical history of a patient.
3. Related to boosting immunity by repeated vaccination.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

mnemonic

(nĭ-mŏn′ĭk)
adj.
Relating to, assisting, or intended to assist the memory.
n.
A device, such as a formula or rhyme, used as an aid in remembering.

mne·mon′i·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

mnemonic

Any linguistic device, such as a rhyme, song verse, formula, acronym or other, which is used to jog the memory.

Example
SADCHALETS—A UK mnemonic used in the context of a major incident (mass disaster) for the information that the first police officer or other person on the scene should relay to their control room:
• S—survey the scene;
• A—assess the scene;
• D—disseminate to those who need to know (police, fire, ambulance, highways, etc.);

• C—casualties (how many, seriousness);
• H—hazards (HAZCHEM, fire, etc.);
• A—access routes for emergency services;
• L—location (exact position and give accurate directions to control room);
• E—emergency services (liaise with others so they know what has been done or needs to be done);
• T—ype of incident (e.g., two vehicle injury etc.);
• S—scene log, if appropriate (e.g., life threatening).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

mnemonic

Any artifice–eg, rhyme, formula, acronym, used to jog the memory
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

an·am·nes·tic

(an'am-nes'tik)
1. Assisting the memory.
Synonym(s): mnemonic.
2. Relating to the medical history of a patient.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
While this is not generally so for the Vula'a, most rikwana are mnemonically contained and, following Heidegger, I suggest that this is its essence and power.
Mnemonically speaking, the `starting-point' of a text is its title; everything else both in the text itself and its accompanying commentary will be linked in an order from this point.
With relentlessly brutalizing irony, the rejections and desertions Byron had earlier sought to displace or repress by the foreign tour that became his Pilgrimage - among them, derisive reviews of Hours of Idleness (1807), mnemonically reexperienced abandonment by the beloved Mary Ann Chaworth-Musters, rebuffs by friends at Christmas and by a kinsman in the House of Lords, the deaths of two Harrow classmates, and (of scarcely less moment to Byron) the death of his prized dog Boatswain - seemed to clone themselves in successors all irreversibly final.
Vocal music (VZV) is further complicated by VZVD, VZVF, VZVS, and VZVT which mnemonically stand for Duets, Four-part songs, Solos, and Trios.
The role of rote learning then - as now in Koranic, Talmudic, Vedic, and Buddhist scriptural schools - is to lay a firm foundation for all further education, not solely as "information" but as a series of mnemonically secure inventory "bins" into which additional matter could be stored and thence recovered.(14) It is also clear from a number of writings on the subject of memory training that rote-retained inventional schemes could be textual as well as graphic: the verses of a psalm treated as sets of orderly mnemonic locations will work just as well as a tree-figure or a rose-rota or a cloister garden.
And the echo of the mnemonically compelling iambic pentameter, hard to avoid in complete English sentences, is never really absent from her work.
Edwards's sculptural work would thus seem to insist that symbolic accounts of the processes of labor and manual production will forever, at least in American culture, also have to mnemonically include the long-repressed referential horizon of industrial labor as slavery.
Such a method could be called a Mnemonically Oedipal Pterodactyl, which clearly shows the problem: in that phrase, the silent first letters spell MOP, but the enunciated second letters spell NET.
A mnemonically engendered oration was persuasive precisely to the extent that it was dramatic, as Enders has argued in her earlier Rhetoric and the Origins of Drama.
These chords, owned by elder men, mnemonically represent totemic song cycles that enact cosmological migrations and events.
Sethe and Denver don't just get their daughter and sister back; they get a puzzled and puzzling, poly-generational, mnemonically tortured, uncertain spirit whose resurrection brings wildly unpredictable results, such as making a whole woman of the spoiled child Denver, and shattering the woman of iron, Sethe.
One reason for this might be that Renaissance writers thought of language mnemonically, that is, in terms of how it resides in the memory rather than as we do when we imagine systems of rules and categories deep-structured in a grammatical unconscious.