mite

(redirected from miter)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to miter: miter joint, miter box, miter cut

mite

 [mīt]
any arthropod of the order Acarina except the ticks; they are characterized by minute size, usually transparent or semitransparent body, and other features distinguishing them from the ticks. They may be free living or parasitic on animals or plants, and may produce various irritations of the skin.
chigger mite (harvest mite) chigger.
itch mite (mange mite) Sarcoptes scabiei.

mite

(mīt),
A minute arthropod of the order Acarina, a vast assemblage of parasitic and (primarily) free-living organisms. Most are still undescribed, and only a relatively small number are of medical or veterinary importance as vectors or intermediate hosts of pathogenic agents, by directly causing dermatitis or tissue damage, or by causing blood or tissue fluid loss. The six-legged larvae of trombiculid mites, the chigger mites (Trombicula), are parasitic of humans and many mammals and birds; they are important as vectors of scrub typhus (tsutsugamushi disease) and other rickettsial agents. Some other important mites are Acarus hordei (barley mite), Demodex folliculorum (follicular or mange mite), Dermanyssus gallinae (red hen mite), Ornithonyssus bacoti (tropical rat mite), Ornithonyssus bursa (tropical fowl mite), Ornithonyssus sylviarum (northern fowl mite), Pyemotes tritici (straw or grain itch mite), and Sarcoptes scabiei (itch mite).
[A.S.]

mite

(mīt)
n.
Any of numerous small or minute arachnids of the order Acarina, including species that damage crops or stored food and species that are parasitic on animals and often transmit disease.

mite

any member of the order Acarina, ARACHNIDS possessing clawed appendages in front of the mouth (chelicarae). They may be free-living (many thousands/m2 in soil) or parasitic.

Mite

An insect parasite belonging to the order Acarina. The organism that causes scabies is a mite.
Mentioned in: Scabies
References in periodicals archive ?
Whether you're banding a tabletop or making a picture frame, make sure the wood color and the grain pattern match at the miters. Selecting matching wood at the lumberyard takes only a few extra seconds and gives you much better-looking miters.
Rest two paint cans on the table and use a rafter square and the miter gauge slots to square the miter table to the table saw.
If you're nervous about installing the mitered crown molding that tops off the trim, check out "Make Your Own Moldings" on p.
These design modifications were required because the pipeline included an unknown number of appurtenances such as bell and spigot joints, chill rings, and miter bends, reflecting the construction practices common in the 1940s.
Zigzag stitch along each traced line through the mitered lace and stabilizer.
Glue and pin together the miter from both directions with 1-in.
A sliding miter saw adds the ability to crosscut wide boards, which is handy for mitering wide baseboards, cutting up to 12-in.-wide shelves to length, or cutting extra-wide crown moldings.
SIZE & DESCRIPTION A 1 3/4" x 5-1/2" x 36" (top) B 1 3/4" x 3-1/2" x 32" (front); miter both ends at 45[degrees] B2 2 3/4" x 3-1/2" x 3-1/2" (sides); miter one side C 1 3/4" x 1-1/4" x 30-1/2" (cleat); 30-degree bevel D 1 3/4" x 1-1/4" x 30" (cleat); 30-degree bevel E 1 3/4" x 2-3/4" x 30-1/2" (base) F 1 1/4" x 2-1/2" x 30" (plywood spacer) G 1 3/4" x 2-1/2" x 30" (bottom) H 1 3/4"x 1"x 36" (band); miter both ends to fit H2 2 3/4" x 1" x 6" (bands); miter both ends to fit J 1 3/4" x 3/4" x 36" (cove); miter both ends to fit J2 2 3/4" x 3/4" x 6" (coves); miter both ends to fit K 1 3/4" x 3/4" x 36" (cove); miter both ends to fit K2 2 3/4" x 3/4" x 6" (coves); miter both ends to fit Materials List ITEM QTY.
CTD Machines introduces its new Model "Mitre Max" DMC70, fixed 45[degrees] double miter cross-cut saw.
Choosing the right blade for your miter saw, and making sure it's sharp, are crucial for cutting tight-fitting miters.
"Mastering the Miter Saw, Part2: Advanced Techniques" is a new DVD from OnSite Productions that demonstrates techniques for cutting compound angles for cutting crown moulding "on the flat." It teaches viewers how to take full advantage of sliding compound miter saws, to make a cut list, to work with an angle finder and use a comprehensive crown chart.
But it's almost impossible--and a bit on the dangerous side--to cut 45-degree miters on the branches on a miter saw.