mistletoe

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vis·cum

(vis'kŭm),
1. The berries of Viscum album (family Loranthaceae), a parasitic plant growing on apple, pear, and other trees; has been used as an oxytocic. Synonym(s): mistletoe
2. Herbage of Phoradendron flavescens, American mistletoe; has been used as an oxytocic and emmenagoque.

mistletoe

(mĭs′əl-tō′)
n.
1. Any of various semiparasitic plants of the order Santalales that grow on the branches of other plants, especially Viscum album of Eurasia and Phoradendron leucarpum of North America, both of which have leathery evergreen leaves and waxy white berries. Extracts of the Eurasian species are sometimes used for medicinal purposes.
2. A sprig of mistletoe, often used as a Christmas decoration.

mistletoe

(1) American mistletoe, see there; Phoradendron jlavescens.  
(2) European mistletoe (Viscum alhum), a parasitic evergreen plant that has been used for hypertension and cancer.
 
Toxicity
Mistletoe is poisonous; the FDA lists it as unsafe and does not approve its use.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dwarf mistletoes are characterized by their relatively small aerial shoots and scale-like leaves.
A number of factors can affect the spatial distribution of mistletoes. Primary among these is host plant distribution.
Results: Extracts from mistletoes harvested from Malus, Populus, Quercus or Tilia trees contain glucose, galactose, mannose, fructose, ribose as main monosaccharides as well as different inositols.
Consider the recent announcement of a new species of mistletoe - encouraging news for holiday season smoochers.
ABSTRACT : This study was designed to develop microencapsulated Korean mistletoe extract, to determine the stability in vitro and to examine its application in milk.
It is likely that the heavy foliage of trees during the rainy season had a masking effect on the mistletoes and hence the lower record of incidence of mistletoe than the dry season.
English mistletoe has long been the foliage of choice for those looking to embark on one of the enduring traditions of Christmas.
All mistletoes are parasitic shrubs, generally rooting in crevices in the bark of trees, though one tiny species, Viscum minimum, grows on the roots and stems of euphorbias.
The fact is, not all mistletoes in the United States are created equal, and few if any are entirely harmless.
Often dismissed as the parasitic kiss of death, mistletoes turn out to form complex relationships with their trees, sometimes fostering new life.
Mistletoes are found in one of four biological families within the order Santales; Misodendraceae, Loranthaceae, Viscaceae and Eremolepidaceae.
Methods: The study was performed with mistletoes from extensively site characterized Scots Pine stands in Germany and Switzerland.