misrepresentation

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misrepresentation

A contract law term for falsely or imperfectly representing a thing; distortion of facts; misleading; lying.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

misrepresentation

Malpractice Representing falsely or imperfectly; lying. Cf Fraud.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, the authors misrepresent their contribution to the FIST concept.
This is a declaration stating that they will remove any reference to the institute from their documents and confirming that they will not misrepresent themselves again.
"By misrepresenting, indeed alleging or inferring that the matter is criminal rather than civil, then Gateshead Council have misrepresented the true legal position.
Mr Salter said Mr Batchelor should not think that because Labour had worked closely with the league on the fox-hunting ban it meant he could control elected MPs and misrepresent the party's policy intentions.
99 explains, a material misrepresentation is not tied to the amount of the misrepresentation but rather occurs whenever there was intent to misrepresent the registrant's financial position and results of operations and such a misrepresentation occurred.
But a few seconds later Mr Moslehi was asked: 'Was there anything misrepresented (on the Bashir documentary) regarding Michael Jackson sleeping with children?'
"Dialog doesn't mean that participants must distort or misrepresent their beliefs," Royer said.
The subjects were asked if the patient's physician should accept the insurance company's restriction, appeal the restriction, or misrepresent the facts to the insurance company in order to obtain coverage for the patient.
When the physicians were asked about the patient with severe angina, for example, they were more likely to misrepresent the facts to the insurer rather than appeal as the appeals process became increasingly cumbersome.
Post managing editor Tom O'Hara says the paper's policy is that reporters don't misrepresent themselves, unless they're seeking "extraordinarily important" information.
As they stand, the readings somewhat misrepresent the temper of Erasmus's attitude and of the debate about women by concealing, for example, the angry contempt he expresses for a patroness who failed him and his frequent and easy use of negative stereotypes of women as a way to build rapport with his readership in the male elite.
Collectors cannot misrepresent the amount you owe, or falsely imply that they represent the government or work for a credit bureau.