felony

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felony

A more serious crime than a misdemeanor with punishment greater than that for misdemeanors; can be grounds for license denial, revocation, suspension, or probation of a health care provider. It is punishable by imprisonment or death, depending on state law and the type of crime.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Privilege was the only defense to common law misprision, such as attorney-client privilege and physician-patient privilege.
insistent theme is that convictions for misprision of felony should not
If it could be shown that Burr "has probably committed treason," their association with him "create the same probability against them, as in the same treason all in this stage of the business must be considered principals." (42) Circuit Judge Fitzhugh agreed "there is probable cause to believe" that Burr committed treason, (43) and in fact his treason was "established." (44) As to Bollman and Swartwout, the issue was whether they committed treason or misprision of treason ("a neglect to disclose the knowledge of a treason").
Misprision of a felony is still defined as a crime under 18 United States Code (USC) section 4, which provides that "whoever, having knowledge of the actual commission of a felony cognizable by a court of the United States, conceals and does not as soon as possible make known the same to some judge or other person in civil or military authority under the United States, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than three years, or both." Courts have held, however, that conviction under this provision requires not only a failure to report information about the criminal conduct, but also some affirmative act to conceal the felony.
For the case of Shakespeare, Bloom (1997: XXIX) sees a composite precursor, represented by Ovid, Chaucer and Marlowe, all having gathered together in order to give birth through Shakespeare, through agonistic, creative "poetic misprision, to "universal literary art," defined by the following aspects:
(18.) In these manoeuvres to reconstruct what was said in the past within the orbit of Marxist thinking, are we perhaps seeing an emergent mode of tendentious criticism that can be described as "the rights of misprision," and which is not limited to postcolonial studies?
1977) (holding that a conviction for federal felony of misprision of a
Neither of these luminaries stands alone: Consider, for example, Wustmann's (1908) prescriptivistic volume, aptly titled Allerhand Sprachdummheiten (all kinds of language stupidities) and Bloom's (1997) concept of "creative misprision," respectively.
O'Bireck faced a maximum of 3 years in prison for pleading guilty to one count of misprision of a felony.
"'Knock me here soundly': Comic Misprision and Class Consciousness in Shakespeare." Shakespeare Quarterly 42.3 (1991): 276-290.
The very concern to discuss ambiguity, the perception that there is ambiguity, that some things are ambiguous in a literary text, bespeaks a desire for meaning--I do not yet speak of a clarification of meaning--that, if Jakobson and Poe and Mallarme et al are even to a slight extent right, may be a sort of literary misprision, a misprision of or about the literary text in the reader/critic's mind in the first place, a sense that meaning is or should be in some manner one of the text's principal concerns, when, when it comes to distinguishing the "literary" from the "non," it might be something quite different that we have to call upon.
THROUGH INCOMPETENCE, misprision, and disingenuousness, the Obama administration has created the potential for diplomatic catastrophe--the collapse of the southern referenda and the Comprehensive Peace Agreement.