mispairing


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mispairing

(1) A popular term for the improper alignment of two nucleic acids.
(2) Mismatching of nucleotides or noncomplementary pairing of DNA strands that occur in low-stringency hybridisation.
References in periodicals archive ?
77) Kool's study of the Z-F pair also revealed slight mispairing between the F bases in replication using KF, (21) and thus we designed the 4MP base from the F base.
riparius chromosomes have been eliminated as a result of mispairing during meiosis.
Halivni notes that he had been "looking for quite a while for an opportunity to write about the mispairing of sin and Holocaust.
Here is the sum of the wisdom I've derived from the experience: It is an unnatural act for editorial page editors to work with cartoonists, a mispairing of the magnitude of a marriage between Hillary Clinton and Howard Stern (or maybe, for that matter, Hillary Clinton and Bill Clinton).
and also due to the fact that protonation can cause mutations in the DNA via mispairing of complimentary bases.
Minimum and maximum rates of mispairing and compensation for ribosomal RNA (rRNA) stem pairs can be determined within a cladistic framework.
The most common error is mispairing of nucleotides, but "slippage" of the DNA polymerase complex can also create errors in short repetitive DNA sequences termed microsatellites, which typically are mononucleotide or dinucleotide repeats.
meningitidis serogroup B involves a variation caused by slipped-strand mispairing in the polyC tract at the 5' end of synD (2-4).
Because this application requires the discrimination of only one mismatch, the presence of a short oligonudeotide maximizes the destabilization caused by mispairing (Lockhart et al.
The presence of the 12-nucleotide repeat strongly suggests that the origin of this insertion is probably based on a slipped mispairing by DNA polymerase during replication.
gigas (see Table 2), are hypothesized In be the first step in the "death" of microsatellites because they prevent slipped-strand mispairing and stabilize the repeat (Taylor et al.