misophonia

misophonia

(mis-ō-fō'nē-ă),
Dislike of sound.
See also: decreased sound tolerance, phonophobia, hyperacusis.

misophonia

Dislike of sound. See also HYPERACUSIS.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, new research at the Newcastle University has proved that people suffering from misophonia have a difference in their brain's frontal lobe.
They describe tinnitus and hyperacusis in literature, film, and music; the mechanism and time course of tinnitus associated with hearing impairment; animal models; psychological mechanisms; tinnitus in military and veteran populations; drug-induced tinnitus; somatic modulation; the influence of amplified music; middle ear myoclonus and tonic tensor tympani syndrome; pulsatile tinnitus; acoustic shock; hearing aids for tinnitus; cochlear implants and tinnitus; self-help interventions; misophonia and phonophobia; musical hallucinations; managing tinnitus in childhood and adults; and emerging approaches to treatment.
Teach Me Tiger by April an era Stevens: Working in Frankie and Benny's ruined an entire era of music for me but this song in particular gave me full-blown anxiety on account of my misophonia.
She also has misophonia, which is characterized by a reflexively intense, negative emotional reaction to certain sounds, such as chewing, sneezing, coughing or tapping.
Although it was not one of the conditions mentioned in the article, I have a sensory sensitivity condition called misophonia (which literally translates to "hatred of sound").
It's about me growing up in Cork, irrational phobias including misophonia.
This discovery has helped further our understanding, however there are still many aspects of misophonia that remain unknown.
Two conditions that produce DST have gained increased attention over the last few years: misophonia and hyperacusis.
Scientifically, a better understanding of the brain's reaction to noise could help our understanding of medical conditions where people have a decreased sound tolerance such as hyperacusis, misophonia (literally a "hatred of sound") and autism when there is sensitivity to noise.
From hyperacusis, an over-sensitivity to certain frequency ranges of sound, to misophonia, literally a "hatred of sound", the research could explain a whole host of conditions.
A better understanding of the brain's reaction to noise could help our understanding of medical conditions with which people have a decreased sound tolerance, such as hyperacusis, misophonia (literally "hatred of sound") and autism.