misidentification syndrome

misidentification syndrome

(mĭs″ī-dĕn″tĭ-fĭ-kā′shŭn)
The delusion that a person, an object, or an environment has been duplicated and placed in a new location distant from the location of the original.
References in periodicals archive ?
Delusional misidentification syndrome. A set of neuropsychiatric conditions in which a person misidentifies people, places, objects, or events (10):
Delusional misidentification syndrome can develop after the onset of focal or diffuse brain pathology, such as right hemispheric stroke, multiple sclerosis, hyperparathyroidism, traumatic brain injury, dementia, and schizophrenia.
"It's a form of delusional misidentification syndrome, or DMS, where the patient believes they're being persecuted by someone who disguises himself as other people.
A complex delusional misidentification syndrome emerged, with simple misidentifications of her relatives; Capgras syndrome with reduplication involving her daughter; misidentification of her own self in the mirror; delusions of inanimate objects, mostly concerning furniture; and, finally, signs of reduplicative paramnesia involving her home.
Moreover, hallucinations in several sensory modalities and systematized delusions (in BG's case, characterized by a complex delusional misidentification syndrome, an element frequently reported in the literature [2, 3, 62]) added two supportive features to the DLB diagnosis.
They argued Kot suffered from paranoia and other acute symptoms associated with Capgras delusion, a misidentification syndrome common in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia.
Delusional misidentification syndrome includes a group of disorders that present delusions about oneself, others, places and objects.
Asomatognosia is a type of misidentification syndrome in which a patient misidentifies or is not aware of the condition of a part of his or her body.
Neurologists and other researchers from Europe and the US discuss Ganser syndrome; Cotard syndrome; Capgras syndrome and other delusional misidentification syndromes; De Clerambault syndrome, Othello syndrome, Folie C deux, and variants; Couvade syndrome; possessions; conversion, factitious disorder, and malingering; Munchausen syndrome; camptocormia; glossolalia and aphasia; violent behavior; culture-specific hyperstartle-plus syndromes; the dancing manias or mass psychogenic illness; and the Alice-in-Wonderland syndrome.
[15] Michael Hoffmann, "Isolated Right Temporal Lobe Stroke Patients Present with Geschwind Gastaut Syndrome, Frontal Network Syndrome and Delusional Misidentification Syndromes," Behavioural Neurology, vol.
Capgras Syndrome (CS) is one of several disorders loosely grouped under the rubric of delusional misidentification syndromes (Christodoulou, 1991).