misdiagnose


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misdiagnose

(mĭs-dī′əg-nōs′, -nōz′)
tr.v. misdiag·nosed, misdiag·nosing, misdiag·noses
To diagnose incorrectly.
References in periodicals archive ?
Far too many people -- whether patients, policy makers, or doctors themselves -- still aren't aware of how often misdiagnoses occur, and how easy it is for anyone to get the wrong opinion.
THOUSANDS of people could be taking unnecessary blood pressure drugs all their lives because of doctors' misdiagnoses, according to a study out today.
Detection rates varied by specialty, with misdiagnoses for 61% of patients who saw primary care physicians, 49% who saw psychologists / counselors, and 44% who saw psychiatrists.
The drug's ability to create symptoms mimicking Parkinson's is well documented, he says, but no one had examined whether metoclopramide generated misdiagnoses among the elderly.
Stir major depression into an emotionally unstable, self-absorbed personality and you have a recipe for a serious psychiatric disorder that clinicians often misdiagnose, a new study finds.
Primary care physicians provide most mental health care, and studies indicate they often misdiagnose depression and its symptoms.
This characterization may lead ophthalmologists to misdiagnose CMV retinitis in patients who seem otherwise healthy.
This workflow conceals the pandoras box of inefficiencies and, even worse, misdiagnoses in ultrasound imaging: the radiologist is only a viewer and the static images or video clip of the case available do not allow him to see what he really wants to see, preventing losing crucial data only available in real time during the patients scan.
Such misdiagnoses caused substantial diagnostic delays, increased the risk of cognitive deterioration, and exposed children to inappropriate radiation and invasive procedures, reported Giulia Carbonari and her associates at the University of (Italy) Bologna.
Sexton misdiagnoses a patient, but it does not reveal the extent of this.
A physician who misdiagnoses bipolar disorder as major depression could inadvertently trigger a manic episode by prescribing an antidepressant without a safeguard mood stabilizing drug.
Misdiagnosing patients cost almost $39 billion in malpractice claims over the past quarter-century, according to a study in BMJ Quality & Safety Misdiagnoses represent more than 28% of total paid malpractice claims and more than 35% of malpractice claim payouts, the study found.