misdemeanor

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misdemeanor

[mis′dəmē′nər]
Etymology: AS, missan, to miss; ME, demenen, conduct
(in criminal law) an offense that is considered less serious than a felony and carries a lesser penalty, usually a fine or imprisonment for less than 1 year. Conviction for a misdemeanor does not prohibit the person from holding public office or practicing a licensed occupation.

misdemeanor

A lesser crime than a felony, usually punishable by fines, imprisonment, penalty, or forfeiture.
References in periodicals archive ?
distinction" between felons and domestic violence misdemeanants in
households have guns, it is likely that hundreds of thousands of convicted domestic violence misdemeanants possess firearms.
Disparate Treatment Between Felons and Misdemeanants
Therefore,] there is a reasonably 'conceivable state of facts' under which it is rational to believe that the felon problem makes a weaker claim to federal involvement than the misdemeanant one.
43) With this recognition, the "No Local [Address]" project was launched in 1991, with its aim of releasing with a "promise to appear" homeless misdemeanant defendants who, had they not been homeless, would simply have received a citation or an infraction warrant.
5 by providing that a misdemeanant NGRI acquittee is to remain in the custody of DMHMRSAS pursuant to Chapter 11.
estimate they will need 640 beds for misdemeanant offenders over the next 20 years.
Indeed, we have seen prophylactic firearms regulation throughout history, from the early nineteenth-century prohibitions on concealed carry to the more recent prohibition on the possession of firearms by violent misdemeanants.
The appeals court found that the city's handcuff policy, that required all detainees to wear handcuffs, supported a [section] 1983 claim of the arrestee who allegedly suffered pain and injury from being restrained with handcuffs that were too small for his wrists, despite being arrested for a nonviolent misdemeanant offense.
Grown weary of finding the same misdemeanant insane every few months, weary of repeated brief hospitalizations, and weary of the regional hospital's neglect of the court's commitment, a local judge took very affirmative action.
The sequential increase was due primarily to the acquisition of National Misdemeanant Private Probation Operations (NMPPO), the largest U.
231 (2004); Traci Burch, A Study of Felon and Misdemeanant Voter Participation in North Carolina, THE SENTENCING PROJECT (Feb.