misclassification


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misclassification

(mis-kla″sĭ-fĭ-kā′shŏn)
Inaccurate diagnosis; incorrect assignment of an individual to a group that appears to have some similar characteristics.
misclassify (-kla′sĭ-fī″)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Worker misclassification is most commonly found in the construction industry, but service-sector workers and others are also prone to be misclassified by their employer.
("The Cost of Misclassification," Verisk Insurance Solutions, presented at 2016 CAS Ratemaking Seminar, March 16, 2016.)
Tony Evers signed an executive order forming a task force charged with recommending ways to combat worker misclassification and payroll fraud.
When later asked by NH Business Review if the misclassification numbers are growing because it is becoming more prevalent or spreading to other industries, Donahue said, "Both."
Clients that experience high employee turnover or significant downsizing when competitors are growing can be red flags for misclassification of employees as well.
Experts say worker misclassification is a growing form of wage theft among workers in nearly every sector of the economy -- from janitors, home health aides and stagehands to data entry clerks, drywall workers and port truck drivers -- which leads not only to underpayment of wages but also absence of benefits and increased exposure to risks.
There was no performance difference between pathologists and cytotechnologists for LSIL misclassification (P = .28), but cytotechnologists had a significantly higher rate of misclassifying HSIL as LSIL (1437 of 27 534; 5.2%) than did pathologists (1032 of 25 630; 4.0%; P = .003).
During 1999-2001, based on death certificates corrected for AI/AN misclassification, AI/AN and whites in Washington had similar age-adjusted total drug, opioid-involved, and heroin-involved overdose mortality rates (Figure).
The AN had a 14% misclassification rate, with a 6.8% false-positive rate for those without dementia and a 7.7% false-negative rate for those with dementia.
Phil Murphy signed an executive order in May to establish the Task Force on Employee Misclassification.
Those employees who enforce their misclassifications in court can also collect attorney's fees from the employer.<br />The decision was limited to the finding that auto service advisers are exempt from overtime provisions under the FLSA, but it also included a new standard to use when deciding a misclassification case "a fair reading." For decades, the Supreme Court has construed such exemptions narrowly, which gave employees the upper hand in cases where the applicability of a particular exemption was questionable.<br />While this decision is unlikely to result in any immediate changes, it will arguably make it a little easier for employers to demonstrate that a particular employee should be exempt from overtime provisions.
will speak at the Knowledge Group's webcast entitled: "Independent Contractor Misclassification and Compliance: Looking Ahead to 2018 Live Webcast." This event is scheduled for May 3, 2018 from 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm (ET).