miscegenation


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Related to miscegenation: social Darwinism

mis·ce·ge·na·tion

(mis'e-jĕ-nā'shŭn),
Marriage or interbreeding of individuals of different races.
[L. misceo, to mix, + genus, descent, race]

miscegenation

Interbreeding between people of different racial backgrounds.

miscegenation

(mĭs″ĕ-jē-nā′shŭn) [L. miscere, to mix, + genus, race]
Sexual relations or marriage between those of different races.
References in periodicals archive ?
earlier, Maryland had passed a statute to discourage miscegenation,
The idea that the defeat of miscegenation policies might shed light on the fate of legislation designed to forestall same-sex equality is understandable and the construction of parallels perhaps irresistible.
In the next segment I will explore how miscegenation plays a role in the rebirth of Rodriguez's new society, and why it is important for a Latino filmmaker even if the ending of the film has some ironic overtones.
Beside her we see a younger black woman with lighter skin, a consequence of the first miscegenation. This woman has a child over her lap.
(3) However, the romantic lead character was engendered by an act of colonial subjugation and still lives under an oppressive colonial order, so evidencing the paradoxical presentation of miscegenation asa response to social injustice.
A derivative of the Latin word miscere, which means to mix, and casta, a synonym of genus, caste or race, miscegenation has a long, troubled past.
Caught within a relentlessly traditional binary world, Ike fails to find any way to use the modern presence of other parties to reconsider race relations, much as black-white miscegenation had failed to provide any such reformulation.
(143) Her support for this cause may be related to her earlier representation of Filipino clients in various matters, including two miscegenation cases.
Pascoe treats miscegenation law that covered American Indians primarily in the case of Oregon.
Like Whites, many Blacks, including NAACP." PEGGY PASCOE, WHAT COMES NATURALLY: MISCEGENATION LAW AND THE MAKING OF RACE IN AMERICA 173-80 (2009)
Despite their liberal bent, such films still valued assimilation, white superiority, and a fear of miscegenation. For example, well into the 1960s, film scripts chose to kill off Indian females rather than allowing them to marry whites.
The very term miscegenation was coined in the North during the Civil War and members of the fledgling Republican Party and the Democrats were united in their mutual disgust for the idea of racial amalgamation.