misattribution

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misattribution

(mis″a-trĭ-bū′shŏn)
A false, incorrect, or mistaken attribution, assignment, or ascription.
References in periodicals archive ?
It told the advertisers not to misattribute statistics in future advertisements.
Not only does he misattribute this statement (which comes from Wired journalist Michael Schrage), but Brookey really means to criticize binary genetic models, not digital ones.
SIR - In the BusinessWales editorial last Wednesday ("Morgan gives export opinion") I'm afraid you misattribute and misquote the famous definition of an ambassador.
Philip says: "The adrenaline starts flowing and we misattribute this to the things we're looking at, so we find them more exciting than we might without the music."
They misattribute the difficulty of understanding the speech to the truthfulness of the statements," said Keysar.
The ASA upheld the complaint and told Ryanair 'not to misattribute statistics in future advertisements'.
The ASA told bosses at Ryanair ``not to misattribute statistics in future adverts''.
Existing theories, until they grasp this, will not only misattribute what they call female sexuality to women as such, as if it is not imposed on women daily, they will participate in enforcing the hegemony of the social construct "desire," hence its product, "sexuality," hence its construct "woman," on the world.
Writers often believe clever quotes and quips dress up an otherwise pedestrian story Editors grumble that writers sometimes carelessly misattribute famous quotations, making the paper look foolish, and causing the city desk's telephone to ring.
Instead, the Welsh text's anonymous author most likely modeled his work on Thomas Speght's edition of Chaucer, which misattributes Henryson's version to Chaucer.
The second problem is that the tweet misattributes the quote to Bill Gates.
Simon thus joins those, most influentially the Triestine Claudio Magris, who locate a crucible of modernism in the city where Svevo took English lessons from Joyce, where Rilke translated the occult signs of "schreckliche" angels on the ramparts of Duino, and where inter alia Scipio Slataper, Bobi Bazlen, Carlo Michelstaedter, and the brothers Stuparich endeavoured to fuse the dominant cultural groups of Europe that folk etymology fancifully misattributes still to the city's name (Trieste as "three-east" eastern Italian nexus of Romance, Teutonic, and Slavic language groups).