misanthropy

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mis·an·thro·py

(mis-an'thrŏ-pē),
Aversion to and hatred of human beings.
[G. miseō, to hate, + anthrōpos, man]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

misanthropy

(mĭs-ăn′thrə-pē, mĭz-)
n.
Hatred or mistrust of humankind.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

misanthropy

(1) Hatred of man (humans).
(2) Hatred of men (males).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

mis·an·thro·py

(mis-an'thrŏ-pē)
Aversion to or hatred of human beings.
[G. miseō, to hate, + anthrōpos, person]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
"'Misanthrope' will deliver the kind of cinematic experience that made me a filmmaker and I can't wait to share it with audiences all over the world," the director added.
"They were very bad, extremely wooden." To learn the craft of verse drama, Wilbur decided to translate an acknowledged masterpiece of the genre, The Misanthrope by Jean what would eventually grow into a major part of his life's work as well as one of the great translation projects in American literature.
Something of a misanthrope's delight, it catalogues shipwrecks, air crashes, railway disasters and natural catastrophes that echoed around the world: when Laki in Iceland erupted in 1783, a thick, dry fog 'covered the whole surface of Europe', and the Day of Judgment was thought by many to be at hand.
Andrew Calder's "Laughter and Irony in Le Misanthrope" insists on the play's importance, teasing out comparisons with and allusions to Horace, Shakespeare, as well as "a strong Montaignian vein running through the play" (105).
Larry Norman gives a sophisticated demonstration of how Moliere's stagecraft metamorphoses a static genre such as satire into the dynamic sweep of L'Ecole des femmes, Tartuffe, and Le Misanthrope, "a satire about satire" (67).
How many YA novels contain references to Hannibal's armies, Moliere's The Misanthrope or Thoreau's Walden?
In this plot, Moliere (Romain Duris) is thrust into farcical situations which would later appear in his plays like Tartuffe and The Misanthrope.
Written by a professional academic ecologist who described himself as "Not a misanthrope, but a defender of Earth against the excesses of anthropes", Earth Alive: Essays On Ecology is an anthlogy of brief yet well-structured essays about ecology and principle.
The heavy use of the literary portrait (1) in Moliere's Le Misanthrope (1666) has been the subject of a considerable amount of critical attention, (2) but the aphorism's (3) frequent appearance in this much-studied play has gone largely unnoticed.
The Misanthrope, Birmingham School of Acting, Crescent Theatre, Birmingham (to Saturday).
This project centres on works by Bulwer, Dickens, Charlotte Bronte, Eliot, Browning, and Conrad, but includes rare books and uncut volumes in the British Library: opening with A Philanthropic Misanthrope by 'Joseph Somebody', a 'moral fable for the 1850s' (p.