lemon balm

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Related to mint family: parsley family
Fringe medicine A floral essence said to be an antidepressant
Herbal medicine

(1) A perennial herb, the oil of which contains citral, citronellal, eugenol acetate, flavonoids, geraniol, polyphenols, tannin, and triterpenoids. Lemon balm is antihistaminic, antipyretic, antispasmodic, antiviral, carminative, sedative, and tonic; it has been used for allergies, colds, depression, eczema, flu, headaches, insomnia, menstrual disorders, vomiting

(2) An extract of lemon—Citrus limon—that has been used topically for herpes simplex-induced cold sores

lemon balm

A mild herbal sedative ( Melissa officinalis), usually taken as tea.
References in periodicals archive ?
Catnip, a member of the mint family, has low toxicity, which means it should be safe for children who need short-term protection from mosquitoes, he said.
Hyssop is in the mint family and was used in the Old Testament for purification and sacrifice." The card also included Bible verses, a religious message, and a prayer.
Catnip is a member of the mint family. Its leaves are very fragrant; that is why it drives cats crazy.
This member of the mint family spreads to form attractive clumps and is not invasive.
Family Name (Latin and Common): Lamiaceae, the Mint family
Specific research at the University of Massachusetts is the regulation of an anti-inflammatory and antioxidant metabolite that is found abundantly in food-grade herbs from the mint family Lamiaceae, such as rosemary, thyme, oregano, spearmint and lavender.
Agastache, a showy, aromatic summer perennial in the mint family, also happens to be nectar-rich, making it irresistible to beneficials.
Hints on Mints There are hundreds of different plants in the mint family. And many of them grow in fresh-water marshes and along stream banks.
viminea), a perennial herb in the mint family (Lamiaceae).
comes from the Pacific Northwest and is a variety of the English mint mentha piperita, although the mint family also includes such flavorful members as sage, rosemary, oregano, and thyme.
The Mentha genus, Chambers points out, is just one among 180 different genera in the broader mint family, Labiatae.
Marjoram is a perennial herb of the mint family used widely in European cooking.