mineral oil

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mineral

 [min´er-al]
any naturally occurring nonorganic homogeneous solid substance. There are 19 or more that form the mineral composition of the body; at least 13 are essential to health. These must be supplied in the diet and generally can be supplied by a varied or mixed diet of animal and vegetable products that meet energy and protein needs. For the recommended dietary allowances of common minerals in the United States and Canada, see Appendices 4 and 5. Calcium, iron, and iodine are the ones most frequently missing in the diet. Zinc, copper, magnesium, and potassium are minerals that are frequently involved in disturbances of metabolism. Other essential minerals include selenium, phosphorus, manganese, fluoride, chromium, and molybdenum. Minerals are either electropositive or electronegative; combinations of electropositive and electronegative elements lead to the formation of salts such as sodium chloride and calcium phosphate.
mineral oil a mixture of liquid hydrocarbons from petroleum, available in both light grade (light liquid petrolatum) and heavier grades (liquid or heavy liquid petrolatum). Light mineral oil is used chiefly as a vehicle for drugs, but it may also be used as a cathartic and skin emollient and cleansing agent. Heavy mineral oil is used as a cathartic, solvent, and oleaginous vehicle. Prolonged use of mineral oil as a cathartic should be avoided because it prevents absorption of the fat-soluble vitamins. Lipid pneumonia caused by aspiration of the oil has been shown to occur in those who habitually take it, especially the elderly.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

min·er·al oil (MO),

(min'ĕr-ăl oyl),
A mixture of liquid hydrocarbons obtained from petroleum, used as a vehicle in pharmaceutical preparations; occasionally used as an intestinal lubricant; can interfere with absorption of fat-soluble vitamins.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

mineral oil

n.
1. Any of various light hydrocarbon oils, especially a distillate of petroleum.
2. A refined distillate of petroleum, used as a laxative.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

mineral oil

A mixture of liquid petroleum-derived hydrocarbons (specific gravity, 0.818–0.96), which was formerly used as a vehicle for pharmaceuticals or as a GI tract lubricant (i.e., a laxative). While MO may usually be used as a laxative without major adverse effect, in excess it can cause anorexia, malabsorption of fat-soluble vitamins and absorption of the oil itself. It may evoke exogenous lipid pneumonia.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

mineral oil

Nutrition A mixture of liquid petroleum-derived hydrocarbons–specific gravity, 0.818-0.96, which was formerly used as a vehicle for pharmaceuticals or as a GI tract lubricant. See Lipoid pneumonia.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

min·er·al oil

(min'ĕr-ăl oyl)
A mixture of liquid hydrocarbons obtained from petroleum, used as a vehicle in pharmaceutical preparations, and as an intestinal lubricant.
Synonym(s): heavy liquid petrolatum, liquid paraffin, liquid petroleum.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

min·er·al oil

(MO) (min'ĕr-ăl oyl)
Mixture of liquid hydrocarbons obtained from petroleum, used as a vehicle in pharmaceutical preparations; occasionally used as an intestinal lubricant.
Synonym(s): heavy liquid petrolatum, liquid paraffin, liquid petroleum.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Even when inside a transformer in a hot climate, the temperature of ester fluids would have to rise by at least 170AC to ignite, a massive 130AC more than mineral oils.
SGS's Analysis of Mineral Oil Components in Food will help manufacturers identify MOH in food and separately measure MOSH and MOAH levels.
Now, TOTAL Special Fluids has successfully developed Scriptane Biolife, a new biorenewable replacement for mineral oil, leading S&S to formulate and bring Bionomic 2.0 to market.
Based on the values obtained and compared with the viscosity of the mineral oil at the same temperatures from the literature [8] we can conclude that the rapeseed oil can be used instead of mineral oil, especially for engines that operate at high temperature.
ISO 32 Naphthenic and Paraffinic Mineral Oil and ISO VG32 Alkylbenzene in C[O.sub.2]
However, the numbers of ACP adult females on treated seedlings at 2 days after spraying, the numbers of 4th-5th instars and the mean numbers of 4th-5th instar offspring per female on treated seedlings at 6 days after spraying were significantly negatively correlated with the mass percentages of C22, C23, C24, and C22+ C23+C24, but not with the emulsifying efficiencies of mineral oils (Table 7).
Many companies have realised the problem and recently some have changed their packaging materials to fresh fibre paperboard printed with inks free of mineral oil.
In 2010, a study by Zurich Food Safety Authority scientists using a dedicated measuring method had detected alarming levels of mineral oil residues from cardboard packaging in food.
Weetabix is also considering new packaging after a Swiss study found that in 75% of boxes made from recycled newspaper, potentially toxic mineral oils could seep into cereals.
Researchers in Switzerland found that mineral oils in printing ink from recycled newspapers used in cardboard can get into foods such as cereal, pasta and rice - even passing through protective inner plastic bags.
It was reported today that cereal firm Jordans has stopped using recycled cardboard while other manufacturers, including Kellogg's and Weetabix, are taking action to reduce levels of mineral oils in packaging.
Having investigated the ingredients of three commercially available mineral oils, which are specifically marketed for use with babies, the following chemicals were found: hexyl laurate, hydrogenated styrene and cyclopentasiloxane, which are all chemical ingredients commonly used by the cosmetic industry.