mineral oil


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mineral

 [min´er-al]
any naturally occurring nonorganic homogeneous solid substance. There are 19 or more that form the mineral composition of the body; at least 13 are essential to health. These must be supplied in the diet and generally can be supplied by a varied or mixed diet of animal and vegetable products that meet energy and protein needs. For the recommended dietary allowances of common minerals in the United States and Canada, see Appendices 4 and 5. Calcium, iron, and iodine are the ones most frequently missing in the diet. Zinc, copper, magnesium, and potassium are minerals that are frequently involved in disturbances of metabolism. Other essential minerals include selenium, phosphorus, manganese, fluoride, chromium, and molybdenum. Minerals are either electropositive or electronegative; combinations of electropositive and electronegative elements lead to the formation of salts such as sodium chloride and calcium phosphate.
mineral oil a mixture of liquid hydrocarbons from petroleum, available in both light grade (light liquid petrolatum) and heavier grades (liquid or heavy liquid petrolatum). Light mineral oil is used chiefly as a vehicle for drugs, but it may also be used as a cathartic and skin emollient and cleansing agent. Heavy mineral oil is used as a cathartic, solvent, and oleaginous vehicle. Prolonged use of mineral oil as a cathartic should be avoided because it prevents absorption of the fat-soluble vitamins. Lipid pneumonia caused by aspiration of the oil has been shown to occur in those who habitually take it, especially the elderly.

min·er·al oil (MO),

(min'ĕr-ăl oyl),
A mixture of liquid hydrocarbons obtained from petroleum, used as a vehicle in pharmaceutical preparations; occasionally used as an intestinal lubricant; can interfere with absorption of fat-soluble vitamins.

mineral oil

n.
1. Any of various light hydrocarbon oils, especially a distillate of petroleum.
2. A refined distillate of petroleum, used as a laxative.

mineral oil

A mixture of liquid petroleum-derived hydrocarbons (specific gravity, 0.818–0.96), which was formerly used as a vehicle for pharmaceuticals or as a GI tract lubricant (i.e., a laxative). While MO may usually be used as a laxative without major adverse effect, in excess it can cause anorexia, malabsorption of fat-soluble vitamins and absorption of the oil itself. It may evoke exogenous lipid pneumonia.

mineral oil

Nutrition A mixture of liquid petroleum-derived hydrocarbons–specific gravity, 0.818-0.96, which was formerly used as a vehicle for pharmaceuticals or as a GI tract lubricant. See Lipoid pneumonia.

min·er·al oil

(min'ĕr-ăl oyl)
A mixture of liquid hydrocarbons obtained from petroleum, used as a vehicle in pharmaceutical preparations, and as an intestinal lubricant.
Synonym(s): heavy liquid petrolatum, liquid paraffin, liquid petroleum.

min·er·al oil

(MO) (min'ĕr-ăl oyl)
Mixture of liquid hydrocarbons obtained from petroleum, used as a vehicle in pharmaceutical preparations; occasionally used as an intestinal lubricant.
Synonym(s): heavy liquid petrolatum, liquid paraffin, liquid petroleum.
References in periodicals archive ?
Once back inside, the temperature of the liquid can reach 100AC in a large transformer, or even as high as 130AC in a small transformer -- only some 40AC below the fire point for mineral oils. This means that a fault or a hot spot in the transformer would only need to cause a modest increase in temperature to ignite.
Looking ahead, we expect to complete our work by studying the possibility of using rapeseed oil as a biofuel for engines operating at low temperatures (100 [degrees] C, 120 [degrees] C) by compound it with the mineral oil [8].
The objective of this research is to experimentally determine the stability and compatibility of candidate lubricants (such as naphthenic and paraffinic mineral oils, uncapped and capped polyalkylene glycols, linear, branched and mixed polyolesters, and alkylbenzene) with C[O.sub.2] and typical compressor materials of construction such as iron, copper and aluminum.
Correlations between the repellent effects against ACP and the emulsifying efficiency of mineral oil were analyzed by Pearson's correlation coefficient performed using SPSS for Windows 16.0.
The BBC reported that cereal firm Jordans has stopped using recycled cardboard while other manufacturers are acting to reduce mineral oils in packaging.
Weetabix is also considering new packaging after a Swiss study found that in 75% of boxes made from recycled newspaper, potentially toxic mineral oils could seep into cereals.
Having reviewed the articles in the supplement and, in particular, the research-based evidence associated with the effect that certain oils (mainly olive oil and mineral oil) have on the skin, this review hopes to clarify the situation and alleviate any concerns parenting practitioners may have.
It said it plans to bring the process to the market in partnership with an international mineral oil company.
The company says its ECCOH 5803 and 5806 meet the low-smoke and toxicity requirements of the London Underground, considered to be the most stringent in the world, while also offering exceptional resistance to mineral oil. These compounds can be applied to railway cables for both infrastructure and rolling stock to simplify inventory requirements, the company says, with advantages like outstanding flame retardance; resistance to mineral oil at high temperature (IRM 903 7d at 100[degrees]C); a wide operating temperature range (-40[degrees]C to 120[degrees]C); 20-year UV resistance based on accelerated aging test results; and crosslink capability via dry silane or e-beam technology for higher temperature resistance, www.polyone.com.
To overcome these limitations, we developed an improved method of chemical stimulus delivery called the mineral oil flood technique, which uses non-polar mineral oil as a medium for delivering polar, liquid stimulants to an individual sensillum.