drug

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drug

(drŭg),
1. Therapeutic agent; any substance, other than food, used in the prevention, diagnosis, alleviation, treatment, or cure of disease. For types or classifications of drugs, see the specific name.
See also: agent.
2. To administer or take a drug, usually implying an overly large quantity or a narcotic.
3. General term for any substance, stimulating or depressing, that can be habituating or addictive, especially a narcotic.
[M.E. drogge]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

drug

(drŭg)
n.
1.
a. A substance used in the diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of a disease or as a component of a medication.
b. Such a substance as recognized or defined by the US Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.
2. A chemical substance, such as a narcotic or hallucinogen, that affects the central nervous system, causing changes in behavior and often addiction.
tr.v. drugged, drugging, drugs
a. To administer a drug to, especially to treat pain or induce anesthesia.
b. To give a drug to, especially surreptitiously, in order to induce stupor.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

drug

(1) An article other than food that is intended for use in the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment or prevention of disease, or is intended to affect the structure or any function of the body. The term does not include a device, or a component, part or accessory of a device.
(2) A substance recognised by an official pharmacopia or formulary.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

drug

NIHspeak Any chemical compound that may be used on or administered to humans to help diagnose, treat, cure, mitigate, or prevent disease or other abnormal conditions Regulatory definition An article or substance that is
1. Recognized by the US Pharmacopoeia, National Formulary, or official Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia, or supplement to any of the above.
2. Intended for use in the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment or prevention of disease in man or animals.
3. Intended to affect the structure or any function of the body of man or animals Substance abuse Any medication; the word drug also carries a negative connotation–implying abuse, addiction, or illicit use. See Alternative drug, Antithyroid drug, Antituberculosis drug, Blockbuster drug, Brake drug, Butterfly drug, Category X drug, Cholesterol-lowering drug, Club drug, Club of Rome drug, Crude drug, Designer drug, Disease-modifying antirheumatic drug, Door-to-drug, Free drug, Gateway drug, Generic drug, Group C drug, Hard drug, Immunomodulatory drug, INAD drug, Investigational drug, Legend drug, Me too drug, Lifestyle drug, Narrow therapeutic index drug, Natural drug, New drug, Non-legend drug, Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, Oligonucleotide drug, Orphan drug, Over-the-counter drug, Overseas mail-order drug, Performance enhancing drug, Pocket drug, Prescription drug, Probe drug, Prodrug, Pseudo-orphan drug, Psychoactive drug, Radioactive drug, Radiomimetic drug, Recreational drug, Second-line drug, Selective cytokine inhibitory drug, Soft drug, Treatment-investigational new drug, Wonder drug.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

drug

(drŭg)
1. A therapeutic agent; any substance, other than food, used in the prevention, diagnosis, alleviation, treatment, or cure of disease.
See also: agent, medication
2. To administer or take a drug, usually implying that an excessive quantity or a narcotic is involved.
3. General term for any substance, stimulating or depressing, that can be habituating or addictive, especially a narcotic.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

drug

1. Any substance used as medication or for the diagnosis of disease.
2. A popular term for any narcotic or addictive substance.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

drug

  1. any substance used as an ingredient in medical preparations.
  2. any substance that affects the normal body functions.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

drug

(drŭg)
1. Therapeutic agent; any substance, other than food, used in the prevention, diagnosis, alleviation, treatment, or cure of disease.
See also: agent
2. To administer or take a drug, usually implying an overly large quantity or a narcotic.
3. General term for any substance, stimulating or depressing, which can be habituating or addictive, especially a narcotic.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about drug

Q. is it ok to use drugs for medical reasons? and who is to decide when is necessary to use drugs when needed?

A. Today the most used "medical" drugs are narcotics- for pain relief, for patients who suffer extreme pain. All sorts of Codaine and Morphine types are used and on a very wide basis, and they are specially perscribed for ones who need them.

Q. How about Psychiatric Drugs for bipolar? One of my friend is suffering from bipolar. Will Psychiatric medications help him to come out of this affect?

A. from what i read- there are certain medication that can help. if the first one doesn't - there is a second and third line of medication. from a personal experience (not mine, a friend of the family) it can even save your friend's life..

Q. What medications are forbidden to take with alcohol? And why is that?

A. I think this web page will give you something to think about:
http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/aa27.htm
apparently there are more drugs you shouldn’t mix with alcohol then I could think of…

More discussions about drug
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References in periodicals archive ?
The appeal of performance-enhancing drugs may even prove to be stronger to the American public than that of mind-altering drugs. The usage of such drugs is still in its infancy in the American society.
A.Y seemed abnormal and anti-narcotics officers referred him to the medical body that subjected him to a blood test which revealed that he had consumed a mind-altering drug.
YOU might think it's pretty iniquitous that a young woman chooses to put a mind-altering drug into her body then relieves the state of pounds 250,000.
In fact, for those crops with significant global volume and market share, tomatoes are the highest valued among those crops that lack an affiliation to mind-altering drugs.
The most alarming aspect of the entire charade is the psychiatrist continues to prescribe dangerous, mind-altering drugs which produce nullifying effects that are then hailed as 'demonstrably effective.' All that's happened is the child has been drugged.
Which is worse, mind-altering drugs or hazardous waste?
Considering that people have been getting high on opium and other mood-enhancing or mind-altering drugs for centuries, the best that governments can do realistically, without annihilating all drug users is to be relentless in the campaign against the traffickers while at the same time strengthening social programs to rehabilitate drug abusers and discourage the habit.
They have since long also been used to elevate mental states or as mind-altering drugs. However, these are the synthetic and chemical formulations of these herbs or substances that have come to play havoc with the physical and psychological well-being of mankind.
Nashville, TN, October 19, 2018 --(PR.com)-- The Nashville chapter of the Citizens Commission on Human Rights (CCHR) held a "lunch and learn" to educate people on living a stress-free life without harmful mind-altering drugs. The seminar was held Oct.
On July 4, the announcement was posted on the Taiwan subreddit of the social media site Reddit for the irony of the slogan, as the phrase "get high" is usually associated with smoking marijuana or other mind-altering drugs. However, one Reddit user suggested that the use of the English word "high" might have been derived from the Chinglish phrase "high eu*a3/4," which roughly translated means "have fun together," while the Taiwanese street slang for getting high from drugs would be ePS (fly).
As WND.com's David Kupelian put it, the following is par for the course: As information about a "perpetrator emerges, a relative confides to a newspaper that the 'troubled youth' who committed the mass murder was on psychiatric medications --you know, those powerful, little understood, mind-altering drugs with fearsome side effects including 'suicidal ideation' and even 'homicidal ideation.'"
Mind-altering drugs being dished-out willy-nilly to people who just need a hug and a bit of talking therapy?