mimetic

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mi·met·ic

(mi-met'ik, mī-),
1. Relating to mimesis.
2. Referring to facial expression; simulation of facial motor function.
[G. mimētikos, imitative]

mimetic

(mĭ-mĕt′ĭk, mī-)
adj.
Relating to, characteristic of, or exhibiting mimicry.

mi·met′i·cal·ly adv.

mimetic

adjective Referring to an agent, molecule or process that mimics another.
 
noun A therapeutic agent that mimics another.

mi·met·ic

(mi-met'ik)
Relating to mimesis.
Synonym(s): mimic.
[G. mimētikos, imitative]

mimetic

(of an organism) having evolved to resemble another species. see MIMICRY.
References in periodicals archive ?
(p145) Students learn not only from a teacher pointing to or indicating representational knowledge, but through mimetically emulating presentative, demonstrative gestures, such as drawing, writing, and thinking out loud.
It is my argument that folklorists who study literature too often search for this dark well, expecting to dip into the essence of a "transcendent" subject mimetically rendered in a novel by an authentic representative of that subject position, someone who can write it as he knows it.
" Drawing, which "links contemplation to action [and] the drawer to the viewer" must necessarily pass "through an obsession with the head as symbol of the thinking living being," if it is to represent "that economy of anguish and pleasure, the soul" rather than remain mimetically tied to the exterior world.
Parish records such as these in Suffolk document the ubiquitous participation of women in the county's traditional, mimetically informed, activities.
Boccaccio thus remedies the inadequacy of Trecento musical notation by mimetically recreating sounds, rhythms, and tunes in the mind of readers (who must have been familiar with many of these songs and melodies).
Harry Thaw's lawyer mimetically appropriated the logic and rhetoric of earlier unwritten law cases, lionizing Thaw's heroism in ridding the world of a moral monster.
The model is mimetically affected by the desire of her imitator.
Lecoq believed that the ancient artist engaged in "memory training," which is not, as it might first seem, about studying motifs--be they works of art or scenes from nature--so intently that you can mimetically reconstruct them from memory.
Despite its demonstrably postmodern attitude toward the self and representation, Senyshen asserts, Le Dortoir frequently strives to bring into focus the inherent semiotic ambiguity of its dancers' bodies--a move which engenders in the audience an intimation of presence and works to reproduce mimetically the narrative's ostensibly modernist preoccupation with recovery and fulfillment.
Every joke about the meter is also aimed at its reader, as in the tumbling accents and inverted syntax of "Hard, hard, hard it is, only not to tumble." (16) The mid-century's "indolent reviewers" are repeatedly and mimetically shoehorned into the meter's trochaic finales.
Rather, they mimetically appear in theatrical episodes across sacred time and space.
progress and development could only be achieved by mimetically copying the West.