mimetic


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Related to mimetic: mimetic desire

mi·met·ic

(mi-met'ik, mī-),
1. Relating to mimesis.
2. Referring to facial expression; simulation of facial motor function.
[G. mimētikos, imitative]

mimetic

(mĭ-mĕt′ĭk, mī-)
adj.
Relating to, characteristic of, or exhibiting mimicry.

mi·met′i·cal·ly adv.

mimetic

adjective Referring to an agent, molecule or process that mimics another.
 
noun A therapeutic agent that mimics another.

mi·met·ic

(mi-met'ik)
Relating to mimesis.
Synonym(s): mimic.
[G. mimētikos, imitative]

mimetic

(of an organism) having evolved to resemble another species. see MIMICRY.
References in periodicals archive ?
Phelan does such a thorough and persuasive job in tracing out this opposition--and the reasons for it--in realistic or mimetic texts that I would love to hear him explain what happens in texts where, from the outset or soon after, it is clear that real-world probability is not particularly relevant; where, in short, the work's internal "probability" entirely overthrows or rejects "external" probability.
I would counter that this statement is only true of mimetic works; in several other classes of texts, ontological issues subvert expectations that the storyworld will resemble the real world and its calculus of probability.
Again Girard's mimetic theory serves as a touchstone, notably the idea that the ritualized reenactment of sacrifice generates its own meanings over time, slowly effacing the primal violence at its origins.
Here, Collins acknowledges that his culminating ambition in interpreting Hindu critiques of sacrifice from the perspective of mimetic theory is to "articulate an ethical position" (p.
This period of accelerated expansion is known as inflation (see, e.g., [187-196] for pioneering work), and a vast class of models attempting to reproduce such period exists in the literature (for an incomplete list, see, e.g., [197-206] and references therein, see also, e.g., [207-231] for more recent inflationary model-building which is extremely closely relevant to mimetic gravity and variations of it).
In other words, Richardson sets up a contrast between antimimetic narrative and mimetic narrative, where mimetic narrative refers to "those works of fiction that model themselves on or substantially attempt to depict the world of our experience in a recognizable manner" while antimimetic narrative "contravenes the presuppositions of nonfictional narratives, violates mimetic expectations and practices of realism, and defies the conventions of existing, established genres" (3).
Girard argued that every human relation is a perpetual "dual mimetic relation"; that is, the subject imitates the object, and then the subject responds to the object's response again and again.
Tensor formulations of higher-dimensional mimetic operators are discussed in [6, 20] for rectangular or logically rectangular grids.
When we enter into a mimetic relationship we, in effect, borrow the other's desire (Girard, Resurrection 76).
This search led him not only to Girard but also to Balthasar, and his 1990 book, later translated as Jesus in the Drama of Salvation, constitutes a novel synthesis of Balthasar's dramatic project and Girard's mimetic theory applied to the Gospels.
A secondary aim of Arndt's study is to illuminate the ways in which this departure is repeatedly staged by references to death, perhaps most graphically in the case of photography, where, she asserts, the means of technical reproduction impede the mimetic function of the medium and instead connect it with death and mortification (115).
It focuses on four figures that are seen as "introspective writers who are not only extremely sensitive to different forms of emotional contagion but also diagnose different symptoms of mimetic sickness with extreme clinical precision" (4).