mimetic


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Related to mimetic: mimetic desire

mi·met·ic

(mi-met'ik, mī-),
1. Relating to mimesis.
2. Referring to facial expression; simulation of facial motor function.
[G. mimētikos, imitative]

mimetic

/mi·met·ic/ (mĭ-met´ik) pertaining to or exhibiting imitation or simulation, as of one disease for another.

mimetic

(mĭ-mĕt′ĭk, mī-)
adj.
Relating to, characteristic of, or exhibiting mimicry.

mi·met′i·cal·ly adv.

mimetic

adjective Referring to an agent, molecule or process that mimics another.
 
noun A therapeutic agent that mimics another.

mi·met·ic

(mi-met'ik)
Relating to mimesis.
Synonym(s): mimic.
[G. mimētikos, imitative]

mimetic

(of an organism) having evolved to resemble another species. see MIMICRY.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cisneros, however, makes that interference serve her larger purposes, because its presence leads the authorial audience to be simultaneously aware of the synthetic-that is, the artificially constructed--and mimetic components of the character narrator and of the story as a whole (for more on the synthetic, see Phelan, Reading People).
The mimetic in (1b), sutasuta to, on the other hand, belongs to the affecto-imagistic dimension, while haya-aruki o belongs to the analytic dimension, and hence there is no wordiness.
Richardson states that mimetic conventions are ubiquitous in most nineteenth-century realist fictions, and it is the traditional goal of mimetic narratives that are similarly "striving for realism or verisimilitude" (3).
The main goal of this article is to provide a consistent 3-D formulation of these operators starting from the second-order mimetic discretizations described in [7, 14], which are unique on 1-D and 2-D equidistributed grids.
Part 1 begins with a stimulating interview between Goodhart and Girard himself in which the latter, commenting on a diverse array of topics including literature, nation, advertising, culture, anthropology, religion, psychology, twins, philosophy, monarchy, and more, provides an accessible entree into mimetic theory by drawing attention to an assortment of commonplace sites and systems where it is in play.
The latest addition to the 'Studies in Violence, Mimesis and Culture' series from the Michigan State University Press, "Rene Girard's Mimetic Theory" by Wolfgang Palaver (Professor of Catholic Social Thought and Chair of the Institute for Systematic Theology, University of Innsbruck, Austria) and ably translated into English by Gabriel Borrud is a 424 page compendium addresses Girard's mimetic theory within the framework of significant trends in contemporary thought organized into seven chapters (Life and Work of Rene Girard; Religion and Modernity; Mimetic Desire; The Scapegoat Mechanism as Origin of Culture; Biblical Revelation and Christianity; Political Implications of the Mimetic Theory; Memetic Theory and Gender.
The inner emptiness of each human inspires the mimetic process.
But instead of being able to turn from a car into a robot with the flick of switch, a single genetic switch allows these insects to morph into several different mimetic forms - it is amazing and the stuff of science fiction.
There is a frenzied mimetic desire, Girard argues, within the academy to produce something "fashionable" and perhaps even marketable (one of his criticisms of the "publish or perish" environment of the modern academy); we must constantly be producing something cutting edge, putting to waste the old school of literary studies (whatever that fashionable school may be at the time) to make room for the "new.
3) At work in Conrad's novella is, quite literally, an outbreak of such mimetic phenomena: somnambulism, compassion, enthusiasm, emotional contagion, hypnosis, depersonalization and suggestion are all fundamentally mimetic, psychic tendencies that haunt the Conradian conception of the modern subject.