mimesis


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mi·me·sis

(mi-mē'sis, mī-),
1. Hysteric simulation of organic disease.
2. The symptomatic imitation of one organic disease by another.
[G. mimēsis, imitation, fr. mimeomai, to mimic]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

mimesis

(mĭ-mē′sĭs, mī-)
n.
1. Biology Mimicry.
2. Medicine The appearance, often caused by hysteria, of symptoms of a disease not actually present.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

mi·me·sis

(mi-mē'sis)
1. Hysteric simulation of organic disease.
2. The symptomatic imitation of one organic disease by another.
[G. mimēsis, imitation, fr. mimeomai, to mimic]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
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References in periodicals archive ?
The exhibits seem to invite the public to see these works as variations on a theme of mimesis.
Central to the argument is a reading of how Lawrence resolves what is a dilemma for Nietzsche: "while celebrating a ritual, Dionysian mimesis among archaic cultures and the immanent psychology it entails, Lawrence condemns the modern masses on the basis of a critique of representational, Apollonian mimesis and the idealist ontology it presupposes" (186).
LOS RASTROS DE LA PRACTICA MIMETICA se confunden con los primeros vestigios de la condicion humana, en que la mimesis es captada como actividad imitativa de la naturaleza: se imita el mundo natural para aproximarse o apropiarse de fenomenos que exceden lo humano.
In looking at their foreign sources and their remakes or adaptations, Krings' drawing on Plato's and Aristotle's conception of mimesis and mimicry calls into question the categories of original and copy.