millisecond


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millisecond

 (ms) [mil´ ĭ -sek″ und]
one thousandth (10−3) of a second.

mil·li·sec·ond (ms, msec),

(mil'i-sekŏnd),
One thousandth of a second.

millisecond

A thousandth of a second, a timing unit on which pulse width and cardiac pacing interval are based.

mil·li·sec·ond

(msec) (mil'i-sek'ŏnd)
One thousandth of a second.
References in periodicals archive ?
PSR J1723-2837: An eclipsing binary radio millisecond pulsar.
Typically, millisecond pulsars are around a billion years old.
OPENING TIME: The blooming of a bunchberry dogwood in less than half a millisecond as captured by scientists using a special video camera taking 10,000 frames every second
Mr Weickmann said El Nino's overall impact on day length was greatest last August through March, when the days averaged three or four-tenths of a millisecond longer than normal.
In fact, a study was once conducted that showed a slight power interruption of just 16 milliseconds can cause shutdown of a computer system, and the same holds true for industrial electronics.
This effect usually lasts more than a millisecond and prevents achieving acceptable tolerances at higher line speeds.
After the mass transfer ceases, this massive white dwarf loses rotational energy and eventually collapses directly into a millisecond pulsar, without the need for further accretion.
- 19 500 kg explosives safety explosion-proof; - 46 000 pcs staples millisecond explosion-proof electric detonators.
To detect a general background of such waves, astronomers would need to monitor 20 of the millisecond pulsars for five to 10 years, with the arrival time of the radio waves determined to an accuracy of 100 nanoseconds, Jenet estimates.
By combining Integral and Rossi observations, a European team led by Maurizio Falanga (Atomic Energy Commission, Saclay, France) determined that the millisecond pulsar IGR J00291+5934 in Cassiopeia has a companion with perhaps as little as 40 Jupiter masses.
* Series C4 thermocouples measure temperature inside the mold cavity with millisecond response times.
Thrice in recent years - namely in 2003, 2004, and 2007 - Earth's spin fluctuated; the jumps broke up the longer-term change by a fraction of a millisecond, and many months before they go back to normal.