millipede

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Related to milliped: centipede bite

mil·li·pede

(mil'i-pēd),
A venomous nonpredaceous arthropod of the order Diplopoda, characterized by two pairs of legs per leg-bearing segment. The venom is purely defensive, oozed or squirted from pores along the body, producing irritation to the skin or severe inflammation if it reaches the eyes.
[milli- + L. pes, pedis, foot]

millipede

also

millepede

(mĭl′ə-pēd′)
n.
Any of various arthropods of the class Diplopoda, having a cylindrical segmented body with two pairs of legs attached to each segment except for the first four thoracic segments, and feeding chiefly on decaying organic matter. Also called diplopod.

millipede

or

millepede

any member of the subclass Diplopoda, class MYRIAPODA, cylindrical in shape, having two pairs of limbs on each of some 70 segments, herbivorous and terrestrial.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some polydesmidan millipedes from caves in southern China (Diplopoda: Polydesmida), with descriptions of four new species.
Checklist of southern African millipedes (Myriapoda: Diplopoda).
An illustrated key to the spirostreptidan millipedes (Diplopoda: Spirostreptida) genera of southern Africa.
This milliped has been reported from northeastern Texas in Camp, Lamar, Nacogdoches, Sabine, and Smith counties (Stewart, 1969).
Discovery of the milliped, Auturus louisianus louisianus (Chamberlin, 1918), in Texas (Diplopoda: Polydesmida: Euryuridae).
Pratical keys to the orders and families of millipedes of the Neotropical region (Myriapoda: Diplopoda).
The biology of millipedes. New York: Oxford University Press.
Habitat and range.--This milliped occurs in riparian habitats as well as streamless cave habitats like pit floors, particularly on rotting wood.
Habitat and range.--This milliped is an exotic of uncertain origin, although indications are that it probably came from Japan.
This milliped was previously known from Colorado and New Mexico, and Hudspeth, Potter, and Randall counties, Texas (Shelley 2000).
This milliped was previously reported from Bandera (Loomis 1959) and Bexar and Kerr counties (Shelley 2001).
Shelley speculated that the lobes must alter the millipeds' posture and locomotion because they are so disproportionately large in relation to the rest of the body that they would otherwise scrape the substrate or become impaled.