mm Hg

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mm Hg

 
millimeters of mercury; a unit of pressure equal to 1 torr, or 133.3 pascals.

mm Hg

Millimetres of mercury. A measure of blood pressure, referring to the height to which the pressure in the blood vessels push a column of mercury.

mm Hg

Millimeters of mercury Clinical medicine A measure of blood pressure, referring to the height to which the pressure in the blood vessels push a column of mercury. See Blood pressure, Hypertension.
References in periodicals archive ?
The findings showed that six months after treatment, systolic blood pressure was reduced by at least 10 millimetres of mercury in 83 per cent of one group of patients.
By the end of the study period, the researchers noted a drop of about 20 millimetres of mercury in the blood pressure of mice that had consumed resveratrol.
Study participants who took a milk protein supplement had 2.3 millimetres of mercury (mmHg) lower systolic blood pressure, compared to when they took a refined carbohydrate supplement.
The most flavanol-rich chocolate or cocoa was found to lower blood pressure by an average of two to three millimetres of mercury.
The researchers recorded their readings after six months and found that as compared to the placebo group, participants who drank black tea had a lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure of between 2 and 3 mmHg (millimetres of mercury).
Intraocular pressure (IOP) increases of 30 millimetres of mercury (mmHg) or greater at any time point, a key adverse event studied in the trial, were seen in 16.3% of the low dose patients and 21.6% of the high dose patients.
A normal reading is around 120/80 millimetres of mercury depending on age.
After six months, their blood pressure levels had reduced by between two and three millimetres of mercury.
The magnitude of narrowing associated with each hour of screen time was similar to that associated with a rise of 10 millimetres of mercury (mm Hg) increase in systolic blood pressure (the top number) in children.
It found 35 per cent of 16-34-year-olds had a high blood pressure reading, which is one that exceeds 140/90 millimetres of mercury.
At that same moment, his blood pressure - normally 147 millimetres of mercury - shot up to a potentially dangerous 190.
Under these new guidelines, a person is categorized as having high blood pressure if their systolic blood pressure (or the top number that measures the blood pressure when the heart beats) is 130 millimetres of mercury (mmHg) or higher and their diastolic blood pressure (or the bottom number that measures blood pressure between heart beats) is 80 mmHg or higher.