Miller


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Mil·ler

(mil'ĕr),
Willoughby D., U.S. dentist, 1853-1907. See: Miller chemicoparasitic theory.

Mil·ler

(mil'ĕr),
Thomas Grier, early 20th-century U.S. physician. See: Miller-Abbott tube.
References in classic literature ?
There is no good in my going to see little Hans as long as the snow lasts,' the Miller used to say to his wife, 'for when people are in trouble they should be left alone, and not be bothered by visitors.
Well," said the Linnet, hopping now on one leg and now on the other, "as soon as the winter was over, and the primroses began to open their pale yellow stars, the Miller said to his wife that he would go down and see little Hans.
said the Miller, throwing the great sack of meal from his shoulder to the ground, "and who are those with thee?
In his slow and pondering way, Skiff Miller looked at him, then asked, with a nod of his head toward Madge:
Yes," said Miss Miller without examining this analogy; "it always made me wish I was here.
The old lady's hearing decidedly improved and the unlucky Miller felt as much out of his element as a dolphin in a sentry-box.
It was not with dry eyes that Jones heard this narrative; when it was ended he took Mrs Miller apart with him into another room, and, delivering her his purse, in which was the sum of L50, desired her to send as much of it as she thought proper to these poor people.
Miss Miller signed to me to sit on a bench near the door, then walking up to the top of the long room she cried out -
Less obstinate, and even less dangerous combats, have been described in good heroic verse; but that of Gurth and the Miller must remain unsung, for want of a sacred poet to do justice to its eventful progress.
The poor miller was much horrified by these tidings, and went in to his wife with a heavy heart to tell her and his relations of the fatal bargain he had just struck with the nixy.
Miller being a man of education and of cultivated habits, and little fitted for the rude life of a hunter.
The fishermen and the millers stood staring in amazement at the two figures, so very different to all appearance from ordinary men, and were wholly unable to make out the drift of the observations and questions Don Quixote addressed to them; and coming to the conclusion that they were madmen, they left them and betook themselves, the millers to their mills, and the fishermen to their huts.