milk

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milk

 [milk]
1. a nutrient fluid produced by the mammary gland of many animals for nourishment of young mammals.
2. a liquid (emulsion or suspension) resembling the secretion of the mammary gland.
acidophilus milk milk fermented with cultures of Lactobacillus acidophilus; used in gastrointestinal disorders to modify the bacterial flora of the intestinal tract.
milk-alkali syndrome ingestion of milk and absorbable alkali in excess amounts, resulting in kidney damage and elevated blood calcium levels.
casein milk a prepared milk containing very little salt or sugar and a large amount of fat and casein.
condensed milk milk that has been partly evaporated and sweetened with sugar.
dialyzed milk milk from which the sugar has been removed by dialysis through a parchment membrane.
evaporated milk milk prepared by evaporation of half of its water content.
milk fever an endemic fever said to be due to the use of unwholesome cow's milk.
fortified milk milk made more nutritious by addition of milk protein, vitamin A, or vitamin D.
homogenized milk milk treated so the fats form a permanent emulsion and the cream does not separate.
milk of magnesia a suspension of magnesium hydroxide, used as an antacid and laxative.
modified milk cow's milk made to correspond to the composition of human milk.
protein milk milk modified to have a relatively low content of carbohydrate and fat and a relatively high protein content.
witch's milk milk secreted in the breast of a newborn infant.

milk

(milk),
1. A white liquid, containing proteins, sugar, and lipids, secreted by the mammary glands, and designed for the nourishment of the young. Synonym(s): lac (1)
2. Any whitish milky fluid, for example, the juice of the coconut or a suspension of various metallic oxides.
3. A pharmacopeial preparation that is a suspension of insoluble drugs in a water medium; distinguished from gels mainly in that the suspended particles of milk are larger.
4. Synonym(s): strip (1)
[A.S. meolc]

milk

(mĭlk)
n.
1. A whitish liquid containing proteins, fats, lactose, and various vitamins and minerals that is produced by the mammary glands of all mature female mammals after they have given birth and serves as nourishment for their young.
2. The milk of cows, goats, or other animals, used as food by humans.
3. Any of various potable liquids resembling milk, such as coconut milk or soymilk.
4. A liquid resembling milk in consistency, such as milkweed sap or milk of magnesia.
v. milked, milking, milks
v.tr.
1.
a. To draw milk from the teat or udder of (a female mammal).
b. To draw or extract a liquid from: milked the stem for its last drops of sap.
2. To press out, drain off, or remove (a liquid): milk venom from a snake.
v.intr.
1. To yield or supply milk.
2. To draw milk from a female mammal.

milk′er n.
A whitish fluid derived from the mammalian mammaries. The term is also used, erroneously, for whitish fluids that simulate milk in colour or constitution

milk

A whitish fluid derived from the mammaries or simulates same in color or constitution. See Breast milk, Certified milk, Humanized milk, Raw milk, Unpasteurized milk, Witch's milk.

milk

(milk)
1. A white liquid, containing nutrients and other substances (e.g., proteins, sugar, and lipids), secreted by the mammary glands after birth, and serving to nourish the infant or young animal.
2. Any whitish, milky fluid; e.g., the juice of the coconut or a suspension of various metallic oxides.
3. A pharmacopeial preparation that is a suspension of insoluble drugs in a water medium; distinguished from gels mainly in that the suspended particles of a milk are larger.
4. Synonym(s): strip (1) .
[A.S. meolc]

milk

The secretion of the breast (MAMMARY GLAND) of any mammal. Cow's milk differs from human milk, mainly in the composition of the fats. Human milk fats contain a higher proportion of unsaturated fatty acids that provide more resistance to bowel organisms than those in cow's milk. Human milk also contains maternal antibodies that provide the baby with protection against many organisms, until it is able to produce its own.

milk

  1. a whitish fluid secreted by the mammary gland in mammals which serves to nourish the young.
  2. any white fluid, such as coconut milk.

milk


milk

milk

(milk)
1. White liquid, containing proteins, sugar, and lipids, secreted by mammary glands, designed to nourish young.
2. Any whitish milky fluid, e.g., juice of coconut or a suspension of various metallic oxides.
3. A pharmacopeial preparation that is a suspension of insoluble drugs in a water medium; distinguished from gels mainly in that the suspended particles of milk are larger.
4. Synonym(s): strip (1) .
[A.S. meolc]

Patient discussion about milk

Q. Can I be allergic only to milk? I don't get anything from eating dairy- only from drinking milk I get itchy and sneezy. is that possible?

A. dairy milk is devoid of any enzymes because it's pasturized
your body needs enzymes to break milk proteins down
if your allergic it means you don't have enough enzymes to break them down
and your body is trying to signal you to stop what you are doing

try getting an enzyme before taking milk if you don't want milk to take out from your diet

a substitute would be rice milk or almond milk

Q. Is this because of the milk change or anything else. After the change of formula milk to cow milk one and half year old daughter seems to be constipated most days. It’s really upsetting her. Is this because of the milk change or anything else?

A. Check if your baby is not consuming the milk more than required and recommended. Large volume of milk, both formula or cows can lead to constipation in children. Reduce her intake of milk see if the constipation resolves, but ensure of her fluid intake like plain water to help her digestive system. It’s always good to keep up a good intake of plain water. Fruit, vegetables and wholegrain cereals are the best sources of fibre and must be introduced and these stimulate the digestive system. Try these as it may of your help, but if trouble persists do visit a doctor or dietician.

Q. Does cow's milk cause acne? I'm 16 years old guy, and I have acne for several years now. Lately, although I treat it as my dermatologist instructs me, it seems I have more zits, particularly on my face. My friend told it can be because for the last few months ago I've been drinking a cup of milk for breakfast (I almost didn't drink milk at all before that). Is it true? The acne really makes me miserable, and the last thing I want to do is to make it worse. Thanks!!!

A. Regardless of what milk does to your acne, emotional stress can also make it worse, so first of all, try to relax- it'll make feel better and can also make your acne better, so it'll make you feel even better. Try to avoid milk for some time and see what helps you most. No one really proved milk has any influence on acne, so you shouldn't feel like you you're responsible for your acne.

More discussions about milk
References in periodicals archive ?
The milk or milk replacer intake was recorded daily, whereas weight gain was recorded weekly along with body measurements.
Optimal concentration of lysine, methionine, and threonine in milk replacers for calves less than five weeks of age.
In Japan, in particular, the addition of antibiotics to milk replacers for prophylactic purpose is strictly prohibited by law.
All the groups had an adaptation period over days 8-14 when they were fed mixed milk (milk replacer and whole milk), with the ratio of milk replacer to whole milk increased from 1:3 to 3:1 gradually during this period.
(2005) indicated that a decrease in milk replacer consumption linearly increased the intake of hay by Holstein calves during pre-weaning period.
The dairy goats would substitute for the milk replacer mentioned in the different methods.
She was too weak to suck on a baby bottle, so I ran a tube from her mouth into her stomach and fed her some milk replacer mix.
Contract notice: Milk replacer for piglets (added to feed).
Following the three-day colostrum feeding period (feed approximately one pint of colostrum two times daily), the kid may be changed to cow milk or fed a good milk replacer (same feed used for dairy calves) if the mother's milk is needed for human consumption.
Twice a day, pectin was added to their milk replacer. It helped plug them up and not starve them.