milk fever


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Related to milk fever: mastitis

milk

 [milk]
1. a nutrient fluid produced by the mammary gland of many animals for nourishment of young mammals.
2. a liquid (emulsion or suspension) resembling the secretion of the mammary gland.
acidophilus milk milk fermented with cultures of Lactobacillus acidophilus; used in gastrointestinal disorders to modify the bacterial flora of the intestinal tract.
milk-alkali syndrome ingestion of milk and absorbable alkali in excess amounts, resulting in kidney damage and elevated blood calcium levels.
casein milk a prepared milk containing very little salt or sugar and a large amount of fat and casein.
condensed milk milk that has been partly evaporated and sweetened with sugar.
dialyzed milk milk from which the sugar has been removed by dialysis through a parchment membrane.
evaporated milk milk prepared by evaporation of half of its water content.
milk fever an endemic fever said to be due to the use of unwholesome cow's milk.
fortified milk milk made more nutritious by addition of milk protein, vitamin A, or vitamin D.
homogenized milk milk treated so the fats form a permanent emulsion and the cream does not separate.
milk of magnesia a suspension of magnesium hydroxide, used as an antacid and laxative.
modified milk cow's milk made to correspond to the composition of human milk.
protein milk milk modified to have a relatively low content of carbohydrate and fat and a relatively high protein content.
witch's milk milk secreted in the breast of a newborn infant.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

milk fe·ver

1. a slight elevation of temperature following childbirth, said to be due to the establishment of the secretion of milk, but probably the same as absorption fever;
2. an afebrile metabolic disease, occurring shortly after parturition in dairy cattle, characterized by hypocalcemia and manifested by loss of consciousness and general paralysis.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

milk fever

n.
1. A mild fever, usually occurring at the beginning of lactation, associated with infection following childbirth.
2. A disease affecting dairy cows and occasionally sheep or goats, especially soon after giving birth.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

milk fever

(1) Puerperal fever, see there. 
(2) Parturient paresis, a nonfebrile disease of dairy cattle following parturition, characterised by hypocalcaemia.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

milk fe·ver

(milk fē'vĕr)
1. A slight elevation of temperature following childbirth, said to be due to the establishment of the secretion of milk, but probably the same as absorption fever.
2. An afebrile metabolic disease, occurring shortly after parturition in dairy cattle, characterized by hypocalcemia and manifested by loss of consciousness and general paralysis.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The monitoring, prevention and treatment of milk fever and subclinical hypocalcemia in dairy cows.
A cow suffering from milk fever has no fight left in her so she is not going to be hard to give an TV.
Lactating animals may be afflicted with parturient paresis or milk fever. Milk fever is caused by a reduced blood calcium level.
If this vitamin D activation system breaks down, metabolic diseases such as milk fever in dairy cattle and osteoporosis in people can flourish.
According to Cadogan, maternal nursing in the first hours and days after birth would prevent milk fevers, bring the mother's milk in sooner, and provide the newborn with a natural--and beneficial--purge.
Cows prone to milk fever, such as your Jersey, are also more prone.
Doctor, can this cow ever recover?The treatment for milk fever is calcium solution directly into the blood given until the cow shows signs of sufficient calcium levels in the blood.
In case 2, herniation might have resulted due to trauma or due to overstretching of abdominal muscle while animal was attempting to stand up after milk fever treatment.
Reducing DCAD prepartum significantly decreases the incidence rates of hypocalcemia and milk fever in dairy cows (Block, 1984; Tucker et al., 1992; Goff and Horst 1997a; Goff and Horst 1997b; Goff, 2008).
Polio, measles, mumps, chicken pox, small pox, influenza, diphtheria, tetanus, typhoid, whooping cough, trench mouth, milk fever, goiters, warts and worms.