mild cognitive impairment


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mild cognitive impairment

Abbreviation: MCI
A subjectively sensed, objectively verifiable loss of memory that may result in difficulties with word finding, naming, or complex skill execution. It does not generally impair a person's ability to carry out normal activities of daily living. About 15% of patients with MCI develop dementia within a year. Synonym: age-associated memory impairment; cognitive impairment, not dementia
See also: impairment
References in periodicals archive ?
Association of the LRP1 gene and cognitive performance with amnestic mild cognitive impairment in the elderly Chinese.
An epidemiologic study of mild cognitive impairment in Kolkata, India.
Donepezil for mild cognitive impairment. Cochrane Database Syst Rev.
Estimates suggest that two per cent to five per cent of people, over 65 and up, to 20 per cent of those over 85 suffer from Alzheimer's.The New York study involved testing 150 patients with mild cognitive impairment using the ten odours every six months.
Some people with mild cognitive impairment progress to Alzheimer disease while others do not.
Estrogen plus progestin and the incidence of dementia and mild cognitive impairment in postmenopausal women.
The study found that compared to those without lung disease, the odds of dementia or mild cognitive impairment were:
The study included 180 subjects with mild cognitive impairment. (1) Half received folic acid (400 mcg/day), while the other half received standard care (guidance on nutrition and activity aimed at enhancing memory late in life).
For older adults who have mild cognitive impairment (MCI)--a decline in memory and thinking skills--participating in computer-based brain training can improve cognitive function, according to researchers whose findings were published in the American Journal of Psychiatry.
SAN FRANCISCO -- Among patients with mild cognitive impairment, those with extrapyramidal signs were about six times more likely to develop non-Alzheimer's forms of dementia than those without baseline extrapyramidal signs, according to a prospective multicenter analysis.
"Our results suggest that careful assessment of extrapyramidal signs in patients with incident mild cognitive impairment can yield important clinical information for prognosis," the researchers wrote in a poster presented at the 2016 congress of the International Psychogeriatric Association.
Thirty-one elderly Brazilian individuals (mean age, 78 years) who had mild cognitive impairment were randomly assigned to consume 1 Brazil nut per day (providing daily an estimated 289 [micro]g of selenium) or no Brazil nuts for 6 months.