migration

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mi·gra·tion

(mī-grā'shŭn),
1. Passing from one part to another, said of certain morbid processes or symptoms.
2. Synonym(s): diapedesis
3. Movement of a tooth or teeth out of normal position.
4. Movement of molecules during electrophoresis, centrifugation, or diffusion.
[L. migro, pp. -atus, to move from place to place]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

migration

Informatics
The process of moving an information system and/or software—including data—from an old to new operational environment in accordance with a software quality system.

Genetics
The movement of one or more individuals between reproductively isolated populations. 

Vox populi
Movement of one or more animals from point A to point B; as in, the migration of birds.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

mi·gra·tion

(mī-grā'shŭn)
1. Passage from one part to another, said of certain morbid processes or symptoms.
2. Synonym(s): diapedesis.
3. Movement of a tooth or teeth out of normal position.
4. Movement of molecules during electrophoresis.
5. Geographic spread of disease-causing agents, rectors, or populations.
[L. migro, pp.-atus, to move from place to place]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

migration

any cyclical movements (usually annual) that occur during the life history of an animal at definite intervals, and always including a return trip from where they began. The exact derivation of the word is from the Latin ‘migrate’ meaning to go from one place to another, but biologically a return journey is part of the accepted definition of the term, the outward journey being termed EMIGRATION and the inward journey IMMIGRATION.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

mi·gra·tion

(mī-grā'shŭn)
1. Movement of a tooth or teeth out of normal position.
2. Passing from one part to another, said of certain morbid processes or symptoms.
[L. migro, pp.-atus, to move from place to place]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The increased desire of North Africans to migrate from their country permanently is understandable given the increasingly difficult economic conditions in the region.
This phenomenon is particularly conspicuous for neurons that have to migrate over long distances to reach their final destinations.
Youth with the intention to migrate were divided when asked about the current state of the economy, with 50 percent of respondents feeling pessimistic or neutral about the economic situation, and the remaining 50 percent feeling somewhat or very confident.
If it is the case that those parents who--though having an opportunity to migrate--believed that the grades of their children would suffer decided not to migrate, while those that believed their children's grades would not suffer decided to migrate, then our results would be subject to selection bias.
With e-mail, about 40 percent of institutions have migrated or are about to migrate to an outsourced student e-mail service; three in l0 are reviewing it.
The resulting snapshot in time does however offer insights into the decision to migrate when placed against the realities of the Colombian experience.
Every year during the spring, birds migrate northward over the U.S.
Unlike birds, however, dragonflies appear to migrate in only one direction.
The team proposed that fish farms imperil wild salmon, which must swim past the farms as they migrate to the sea.
In addition Openreach has introduced a new mass migration product which will allow LLU operators to migrate existing Wholesale Line Rental end customers to full LLU on an aggregated basis.
While the vast majority of migrants occupy low-skilled jobs, educated professionals also migrate. Large numbers of well-educated Ghanaians, for example, have migrated to Canada, the United States and Western Europe in search of economic opportunity.
Like those who migrate today, people in the past also maintained bonds across borders, with relatives in far distant places.